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  • 24 Jun 2016
    The 42nd Saturn Awards took place recently in Burbank, and some Star Trek alumni walked away with awards. Writer-Producer Brannon Braga received...

    The 42nd Saturn Awards took place recently in Burbank, and some Star Trek alumni walked away with awards.

    Writer-Producer Brannon Braga received the Special Recognition Award. “Thank you @SaturnAwards1 for an amazing night with friends and colleagues,” he said, via Twitter. “And to everyone for all their kind words.”

    William Shatner won the Best Guest Star on Television award for his appearance on Syfy‘s Haven.

    Nichelle Nichols received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the ceremony. “This means so much,” she said. “Thank you.”

    The full list of awards can be found here.

  • 24 Jun 2016
    Music star Rihanna has contributed a new single to the Star Trek Beyond soundtrack. The single, which was written in 2014, is...

    Music star Rihanna has contributed a new single to the Star Trek Beyond soundtrack.

    The single, which was written in 2014, is called Sledgehammer.

    The advertisement for Sledgehammer could be seen in the pop section of the U.S. iTunes store.

    This isn’t the first time that modern day music is included in Star Trek. A young James T. Kirk was a fan of the music of the Beastie Boys in Star Trek (2009).

  • 24 Jun 2016
    Bryan Fuller has seen some of the Internet rumors regarding the new Star Trek television series, and he set the record straight...

    Bryan Fuller has seen some of the Internet rumors regarding the new Star Trek television series, and he set the record straight about them.

    One of the rumors was regarding the timeframe of the new series. “I’ve read that we’re [set] before Next Generation, after Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country,” he said; “which is false.”

    Another rumor concerned the format of the show. “I’ve read that it’s an anthology show, which is not accurate,” he said.

    “So it’s interesting to see those suggestions, and seeing the truth mixed in with them and going like, ‘Oh, they got that part right…’ But it’s sort of on the truth-o-meter on PolitiFacts. It’s sort of like some truth, and a lot of like, ‘No — pants on fire! That’s not true.'”

    Expect to see more than just one main crew, said Fuller. “I think we will be seeing lots of crews in the story,” he said. “One of the things that is exciting for me is that we are telling a Star Trek story in a modern way. We’re telling a thirteen-chapter story in this first season. It’s nice to be able to dig deep into things that would have been breezed passed if we were doing episodic and had to contain a story to an episode.”

  • 23 Jun 2016
    Harry Kim is drawn to a world of beautiful women who insist that he is a descendant of their people. Plot Summary:...

    Harry Kim is drawn to a world of beautiful women who insist that he is a descendant of their people.

    Plot Summary: While Voyager is replying to a friendly greeting from a Nasari vessel, Kim warns that the Nasari are charging weapons and fires on their ship without permission. The resulting battle causes serious damage to Voyager and nearly brings about Torres’s death. Janeway dismisses Kim from duty, suggesting a medical examination that initially suggests only battle injuries, though soon afterward, Kim begins to develop unusual skin characteristics. The crew discovers that the Nasari were in fact charging weapons just as Kim claimed, and when Kim says he has a hunch about where they should travel to be safe, Janeway agrees to follow his lead. Voyager arrives at Taresia, a friendly planet populated mostly by women who greet Kim enthusiastically. The leader, Lyris, tells Kim that he is a child of Taresians, one of many embryos sent away to be implanted in an alien womb so that the offspring can find their way back to tell the Taresians about the galaxy. The Doctor finds that Kim’s DNA now shows non-human characteristics, and Kim decides to explore Taresia – a planet where males are so rare that each takes several wives. Many attractive women express interest in Kim and he becomes friendly with Taymon, a Taresian man about to married to three women. But Kim soon finds that his communications with Voyager have been blocked, and when he seeks out Taymon for help, he discovers that the brides have sucked the life out of their groom. The reason there are almost no men on Taresia is that the men must die to produce enough genetic material for the women to conceive children. Meanwhile, the Doctor finds that Kim’s human DNA was recently altered by a retrovirus and tells Janeway, who also learns that Taresia is now blocking Voyager’s signals. The crew fights past a Taresian patrol ship to rescue Kim and is able to escape when the Nasari engage the Taresians.

    Analysis: I’m of a double mind about how to review this episode, which I had not seen (and had tried to block out) since it first aired nearly 20 years ago. The first review is the one I wrote last time – the one you all probably expect me to write – where I point out that the science fiction is terrible, the actors are all flat and unconvincing (though really, with that dialogue, I shouldn’t blame them), and the level of misogyny reaches new lows. “Favorite Son” might actually be worse than the original series offering “That Which Survives” – the one with sexy women who kill the men they touch – because that one has an explanation that, while stupid, at least makes a modicum of scientific sense, as opposed to Taresian reproduction, which makes none and should have led to extinction already. But the part of me keeping score of all the sins of “Favorite Son” and making note of all the sources from which it steals its plot can’t help but notice the time-honored tradition of which it’s a part. The myth of the succubus is at least a thousand years old and earlier mythologies had their own versions, to which Star Trek adds the twist that the fetuses produced when rapacious women take advantage of innocent men are carried through space to be implanted in unsuspecting females of different species. It still makes no sense – even if the fable Lyris spins about male Taresians finding their way home across the galaxy had been true, even if Kim had been driven genetically to want to travel into space, Voyager’s crew must know that logically it’s just an accident that Kim made it so far into the Delta Quadrant – but the legend that a demon could collect seed from a sleeping or dead man and turn it over to Incubi or the Devil to implant in a human woman makes even less sense, yet people believed it for centuries.

    All this to say that it’s sometimes interesting to think about the sources of the sexism and sexual anxiety that pervade Voyager, not all of which is the fault of the writing staff. The teleplay for “Favorite Son” was, after all, written by a woman, Lisa Klink. It’s nothing as simple as carrying over the non-progressive expectations of the original series, in which Gene Roddenberry concluded that an audience was more likely to believe in an alien first officer than a female one and gave the senior female bridge officer little to do beyond acting like the ship’s receptionist. The Next Generation reflected a time-honored tradition of fearing women in power as well, whether it was Ardra posing as the Devil, the women of “Angel One” keeping their men oppressed and sexualized, or Lwaxana Troi using her position as a diplomat and empath to try to take advantage of male crewmembers. Now we have a female captain yet it seems as if the series doesn’t know how to create women who are full-fledged individuals with independent sexuality. “Favorite Son” isn’t the first Star Trek installment to give us women who swear that they exist only to give men pleasure, nor the first culture where aggressive touching that would be considered harassment in many human societies is treated as though it should be every young man’s dream. The women here don’t sound vacuous like the ones in “Spock’s Brain” who need a man to control their city, and although the science behind their reproductive technology may be absurd, they’re scripted as clever enough technologically to make it work across multiple star systems and to fend off alien adversaries. Voyager‘s writers supposedly were told by UPN that the initial draft of “Favorite Son” did not have enough sex or violence, so many of the problems with this episode were not of their own making.

    That said, it’s frustrating that they can’t find a way to make it all a little interesting, a little less by the numbers. These writers still don’t know anything about Kim besides the fact that he loves his parents. Being told that one’s mother was violated by aliens should evoke a bitter, life-altering response, like Sisko’s when he learned that his mother was taken over by a Prophet, or, since this show has been oblivious to its casual dismissal of rape for several weeks in a row, at least we should see a more Harry-like response to being fawned over by women as if he were James T. Kirk. His initial discomfort marks the most believable part of his interaction with the women who want to suck out his life force; the later kissing and snuggling feels icky, since it’s not even being played for humor. The initial plan for the story called for Kim to discover that he really was an alien, a delusion he treats here only with pleasure rather than the concern and uncertainty that nearly all adopted children experience upon learning of their biological parents, whether their relationships with the families that raised them are wonderful or awful. And yet I find myself snickering inappropriately. Kim winds up with the wonderful actress and stuntwoman Patricia Tallman, best known as Lyta Alexander on Babylon Five, chasing him with a pain stick! The terror in his reaction to her is so much more believable than his pretense at interest in bondage when a woman playfully offers to let him tie her up. I can forgive “Underwater Bimbos From Outer Space” for sheer hilarity; I like to imagine that Paris got his idea for Queen Arachnia not from 20th century cheesy movies, which it’s silly that he would have with him in the Delta Quadrant, but from Kim’s experiences with the spider women of Taresia. Unsurprisingly, Paris finds the women exciting, as he tells Kim even after he knows what the women intend for their mates. I bet he’d have done fine with Losira. “I am for you, Tom Paris!”

  • 23 Jun 2016
    At the recent Saturn Awards, Bryan Fuller gave a few details about the new Star Trek television series, which will be streamed...

    At the recent Saturn Awards, Bryan Fuller gave a few details about the new Star Trek television series, which will be streamed on CBS All Access early next year.

    Fuller was excited and happy to be named showrunner for the new series. “It’s wonderful. It’s surreal. I didn’t want to be a writer. I wanted to be a Star Trek writer, so to be able to craft a new iteration of the show with new characters and a whole new adventure and whole new way of telling stories that you haven’t been able to tell on Star Trek is honorable and it’s a dream come true. It’s hard to articulate that.”

    The show is already being written, with the first season containing thirteen episodes. “We’ve got the arc of the first season already written, or arced out,” said Fuller. “And we’ve got the first six episodes entirely broken.”

    Start looking for more detailed information, including the timeline, very soon. “I imagine around [San Diego] Comic-con,” said Fuller, saying when he thought more details would be released. “It’s interesting because normally I love talking about everything, and I’m sort of relieved I’ve been muzzled by CBS on it because I do less interviews, so I can spend more time writing, but I love talking about Star Trek and I love being involved in it, so I’ll be very excited to share when the muzzle comes off of me.”

    Casting is in progress. “I’ve met with a few actors, and it’s an interesting process,” said Fuller. “There [are] a few people that we like and we want to carry on what Star Trek does best, which is being progressive. So it’s fascinating to look at all of these roles through a colorblind prism and a gender-blind prism, so that’s exciting.

    “We haven’t booked directors yet. We booked Vincenzo Natali, who will be our producing director, but he’s not directing the first episode.”

    Stages (in Vancouver) have been selected too. “Yes, we’ve got stages and we’re very far along,” said Fuller. “We’re going to be putting sets up in a couple of weeks.”

    Shooting will begin “in September,” said Fuller, and will last until “probably March.” Run time should be around an hour, but “our runtime is flexible because it’s streaming.”

    Please enable Javascript to watch this video

  • 23 Jun 2016
    Fans of teddy bears will be happy with the news that Build-A-Bear has announced a 50th anniversary Star Trek collection of bears....

    Fans of teddy bears will be happy with the news that Build-A-Bear has announced a 50th anniversary Star Trek collection of bears.

    BuildABear-2-062316

    The bears include:

    • Star Trek 50th Anniversary Bear – $25.00
    • Star Trek Spock Bear (without uniform) – $28.00
    • Commander Star Trek Spock Bear Set (with uniform, boots and phaser) – $55.50
    • Voyager Star Trek 50th Anniversary Bear Set – $52.50
    • Star Trek Blue Uniform Two-piece – $15.00
    • Star Trek Gold Uniform Two-piece – $15.00
    • Star Trek Red Uniform Two-piece – $15.00
    • Star Trek Phaser – $5.00
    • Theme from Star Trek chip – $7.00

    To order any of these, head to the link located here.

  • 23 Jun 2016
    CBS and Paramount Pictures have released new guidelines for those wishing to make Star Trek fan films. “Dear Star Trek fans,” they...

    CBS and Paramount Pictures have released new guidelines for those wishing to make Star Trek fan films.

    “Dear Star Trek fans,” they said in a release accompanying the new rules. “Star Trek fandom is like no other.

    “Your support, enthusiasm and passion are the reasons that Star Trek has flourished for five decades and will continue long into the future. You are the reason the original Star Trek series was rescued and renewed in 1968, and the reason it has endured as an iconic and multi-generational phenomenon that has spawned seven television series and thirteen movies.

    “Throughout the years, many of you have expressed your love for the franchise through creative endeavors such as fan films. So today, we want to show our appreciation by bringing fan films back to their roots.

    “The heart of these fan films has always been about expressing one’s love and passion for Star Trek. They have been about fan creativity and sharing unique stories with other fans to show admiration for the TV shows and movies. These films are a labor of love for any fan with desire, imagination and a camera.

    “We want to support this innovation and encourage celebrations of this beloved cultural phenomenon. It is with this perspective in mind that we are introducing a set of guidelines at Star Trek Fan Films.

    “Thank you for your ongoing and steadfast enthusiasm and support, which ensure that Star Trek will continue to inspire generations to come.

    CBS and Paramount Pictures

    According to the new rules, Star Trek fan films must be non-professional and amateur. They posted ten “guidelines for avoiding objections.”

    • The fan production must be less than 15 minutes for a single self-contained story, or no more than 2 segments, episodes or parts, not to exceed 30 minutes total, with no additional seasons, episodes, parts, sequels or remakes.
    • The title of the fan production or any parts cannot include the name “Star Trek.” However, the title must contain a subtitle with the phrase: “A STAR TREK FAN PRODUCTION” in plain typeface. The fan production cannot use the term “official” in either its title or subtitle or in any marketing, promotions or social media for the fan production.
    • The content in the fan production must be original, not reproductions, recreations or clips from any Star Trek production. If non-Star Trek third party content is used, all necessary permissions for any third party content should be obtained in writing.
    • If the fan production uses commercially-available Star Trek uniforms, accessories, toys and props, these items must be official merchandise and not bootleg items or imitations of such commercially available products.
    • The fan production must be a real “fan” production, i.e., creators, actors and all other participants must be amateurs, cannot be compensated for their services, and cannot be currently or previously employed on any Star Trek series, films, production of DVDs or with any of CBS or Paramount Pictures’ licensees.
    • The fan production must be non-commercial:
      -CBS and Paramount Pictures do not object to limited fundraising for the creation of a fan production, whether one or two segments and consistent with these guidelines, so long as the total amount does not exceed $50,000, including all platform fees, and when the $50,000 goal is reached, all fundraising must cease.
      -The fan production must only be exhibited or distributed on a no-charge basis and/or shared via streaming services without generating revenue.
      -The fan production cannot be distributed in a physical format such as DVD or Blu-ray.
      -The fan production cannot be used to derive advertising revenue including, but not limited to, through for example, the use of pre or post-roll advertising, click-through advertising banners, that is associated with the fan production.
      -No unlicensed Star Trek-related or fan production-related merchandise or services can be offered for sale or given away as premiums, perks or rewards or in connection with the fan production fundraising.
      -The fan production cannot derive revenue by selling or licensing fan-created production sets, props or costumes.
    • The fan production must be family friendly and suitable for public presentation. Videos must not include profanity, nudity, obscenity, pornography, depictions of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, or any harmful or illegal activity, or any material that is offensive, fraudulent, defamatory, libelous, disparaging, sexually explicit, threatening, hateful, or any other inappropriate content. The content of the fan production cannot violate any individual’s right of privacy.
    • The fan production must display the following disclaimer in the on-screen credits of the fan productions and on any marketing material including the fan production website or page hosting the fan production:
      -“Star Trek and all related marks, logos and characters are solely owned by CBS Studios Inc. This fan production is not endorsed by, sponsored by, nor affiliated with CBS, Paramount Pictures, or any other Star Trek franchise, and is a non-commercial fan-made film intended for recreational use. No commercial exhibition or distribution is permitted. No alleged independent rights will be asserted against CBS or Paramount Pictures.”
    • Creators of fan productions must not seek to register their works, nor any elements of the works, under copyright or trademark law.
    • Fan productions cannot create or imply any association or endorsement by CBS or Paramount Pictures.

    “CBS and Paramount Pictures reserve the right to revise, revoke and/or withdraw these guidelines at any time in their own discretion. These guidelines are not a license and do not constitute approval or authorization of any fan productions or a waiver of any rights that CBS or Paramount Pictures may have with respect to fan fiction created outside of these guidelines”

    Axanar Productions, currently embroiled in a lawsuit with CBS and Paramount, had this to say about the new rules. “After a review of CBS and Paramount‘s announcement of their guidelines for Star Trek fan films, I’m really disappointed that this set of guidelines represents the studios’ best efforts on behalf of fans.  These guidelines appear to have been tailor-made to shut down all of the major fan productions and stifle fandom. In no way can that be seen as supportive or encouraging, which is very disheartening.

    “While CBS and Paramount claim to want to encourage the passion of fans to produce “reasonable fan fiction”, the restrictions presented do just the opposite, willfully ignoring over forty years of fan works that helped buoy the Star Trek franchise through some very lean years and enthusiastically spread the magic of the franchise in more plentiful times.

    “Around the franchise’s 50th anniversary, we would have hoped CBS and Paramount would have taken this opportunity to unite with Star Trek fans in celebration of their creativity, not seek to crush it.”

    “We do not yet know how the recent guidelines will affect Star Trek Continues,” said Vic Mignogna, of Star Trek Continues, “but we fully respect CBS and their right to protect their property however they see fit. STC was created solely out of love and the desire to pay tribute to TOS, not for profit or self-promotion.”

  • 24 Jun 2016
    Rihanna fan sites are abuzz this morning with the news that the pop star is contributing a single called “Sledgehammer” to the Star Trek Beyond soundtrack, a first for the franchise. We’ve heard songs in the movies before (The Beastie Boys, Steppenwolf) but this is the first time a pop song has been officially a soundtrack single. And who better than Rihanna? An avowed Star Trek fan, she collaborated with Dior last month on a line of “futuristic, reflective” sunglasses, inspired by Geordi La Forge’s VISOR. They range in price from $840 to $1950, so they’re not for the uncommitted. “I’ve always been obsessed with his eyewear, and when I got to Dior and saw all the materials I could play with, it all just came together,” she told Women’s Wear Daily. She was also a famous face that popped up on the screen giving Trek some love, during the Beyond fan event last month (her segement starts at about 0:39). Rihanna’s been talking about “Sledgehammer” since 2014, but the song is making its debut on the Beyond soundtrack. Eagle-eyed fans spotted it in a banner ad on iTunes last night, and the news has been making its way across Twitter and Instagram all morning. The song is expected to appear during the movie’s end credits; no date on when it’ll be available to download, but we’ll keep you posted.
  • 24 Jun 2016
    Star Trek 2017 showrunner Bryan Fuller revealed more details about the highly-anticipated new series in an interview with Moviefone. Contrary to rumors that the new series would be an anthology show with each season focusing on a different time in Trek lore, Fuller said “I’ve read that this is an anthology show, which is not accurate.” Fuller also shot down the rumor that the series would take place between Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Addressing the teaser trailer that hinted that the show would feature new crews, which many believed suggested the series would be an anthology show, Fuller said that we will be seeing “lots of crews in the story.” Fuller continued, “One of the things that’s exciting for me is that we are telling a Star Trek story in a modern way. We’re telling a 13-chapter story in this first season. It’s nice to be able to dig deep into things that would have been breezed passed if we were doing episodic and had to contain a story within an episode.” When questioned whether the new series would revisit any familiar characters, Fuller teased “eventually.” On Nicholas Meyer’s involvement in the series, Fuller said that “[Meyer has brought] a clarity and cleanliness to the storytelling. An ability to ground science fiction in a relatable way, and also making sure that we’re telling character stories.” You can read the entire interview here.
  • 23 Jun 2016
    Star Trek 2017 show runner Bryan Fuller in an interview with Collider revealed a heap of new details on the much-anticipated new Star Trek series scheduled to debut in January 2017. Fuller revealed that the first season of the show, which will consist of thirteen episodes, has been completely arced out, with the first six episodes completely broken down. He confirmed that the show will feature a single story over its thirteen episodes. However, Fuller did not reveal whether that story is self-contained in one season, or part of a larger arc that will run for the entire series. Fuller commented that he has been “muzzled” by CBS, which he viewed as a positive as he “loves to talk about everything” and this allows him to “spend more time writing.” Fuller expects more details to be announced during the San Diego Comic Con between July 21-25th. Fuller recalled that, when he first met with CBS regarding the new show, he had asked the network whether they had a plan. While CBS said “no,” Fuller noted that he had said “I have a plan,” and the two sides began talking. Fuller further revealed that stages have been booked and the production will begin erecting sets in the next several weeks. He also said that the casting process has begun. Fuller noted that, because the series will be airing on CBS All-Access, the show will not have to adhere to typical network standards and practices. However, don’t expect the new Star Trek to look and sound like a premium-channel show with nudity and profanity. Fuller explained, “It will likely affect us more in terms of what we can do graphically, but Star Trek’s not necessarily a universe where I want to hear a lot of profanity, either. Production on the series will run between September 2016 and March 2017, according to Fuller. Vincenzo Natali, whom Fuller worked with on Hannibal, has been hired as the show’s producing director. However, Fuller did not announce the director for the first episode. Since the show is on a streaming service, the writers will have flexibility with the runtime of episodes. However, CBS has issued unspecified parameters regarding how short or long an episode can be. Finally, Fuller noted that visual effects producers had been hired and are putting together a team because much of the VFX work will be produced in-house, rather than farmed out to VFX studios. Please enable Javascript to watch this video
  • 23 Jun 2016
    Amidst ongoing litigation against fan film Star Trek Axanar, today CBS and Paramount Pictures have issued guidelines to all current and would-be Star Trek fan productions. The rules will be an adjustment for many fan projects, particularly ongoing longer-form shows like Star Trek Continues, Star Trek New Voyages, and others. From the press release: CBS and Paramount Pictures are big believers in reasonable fan fiction and fan creativity, and, in particular, want amateur fan filmmakers to showcase their passion for Star Trek.  Therefore, CBS and Paramount Pictures will not object to, or take legal action against, Star Trek fan productions that are non-professional and amateur and meet the following guidelines. Guidelines for Avoiding Objections: The fan production must be less than 15 minutes for a single self-contained story, or no more than 2 segments, episodes or parts, not to exceed 30 minutes total, with no additional seasons, episodes, parts, sequels or remakes. The title of the fan production or any parts cannot include the name “Star Trek.” However, the title must contain a subtitle with the phrase: “A STAR TREK FAN PRODUCTION” in plain typeface. The fan production cannot use the term “official” in either its title or subtitle or in any marketing, promotions or social media for the fan production. The content in the fan production must be original, not reproductions, recreations or clips from any Star Trek production. If non-Star Trek third party content is used, all necessary permissions for any third party content should be obtained in writing. If the fan production uses commercially-available Star Trek uniforms, accessories, toys and props, these items must be official merchandise and not bootleg items or imitations of such commercially available products. The fan production must be a real “fan” production, i.e., creators, actors and all other participants must be amateurs, cannot be compensated for their services, and cannot be currently or previously employed on any Star Trek series, films, production of DVDs or with any of CBS or Paramount Pictures’ licensees. The fan production must be non-commercial: CBS and Paramount Pictures do not object to limited fundraising for the creation of a fan production, whether 1 or 2 segments and consistent with these guidelines, so long as the total amount does not exceed $50,000, including all platform fees, and when the $50,000 goal is reached, all fundraising must cease. The fan production must only be exhibited or distributed on a no-charge basis and/or shared via streaming services without generating revenue. The fan production cannot be distributed in a physical format such as DVD or Blu-ray. The fan production cannot be used to derive advertising revenue including, but not limited to, through for example, the use of pre or post-roll advertising, click-through advertising banners, that is associated with the fan production. No unlicensed Star Trek-related or fan production-related merchandise or services can be offered for sale or given away as premiums, perks or rewards or in connection with the fan production fundraising. The fan production cannot derive revenue by selling or licensing fan-created production sets, props or costumes. The fan production must be family friendly and suitable for public presentation. Videos must not include profanity, nudity, obscenity, pornography, depictions of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, or any harmful or illegal activity, or any material that is offensive, fraudulent, defamatory, libelous, disparaging, sexually explicit, threatening, hateful, or any other inappropriate content. The content of the fan production cannot violate any individual’s right of privacy. The fan production must display the following disclaimer in the on-screen credits of the fan productions and on any marketing material including the fan production website or page hosting the fan production: “Star Trek and all related marks, logos and characters are solely owned by CBS Studios Inc. This fan production is not endorsed by, sponsored by, nor affiliated with CBS, Paramount Pictures, or any other Star Trek franchise, and is a non-commercial fan-made film intended for recreational use.  No commercial exhibition or distribution is permitted. No alleged independent rights will be asserted against CBS or Paramount Pictures.” Creators of fan productions must not seek to register their works, nor any elements of the works, under copyright or trademark law. Fan productions cannot create or imply any association or endorsement by CBS or Paramount Pictures. CBS and Paramount Pictures reserve the right to revise, revoke and/or withdraw these guidelines at any time in their own discretion. These guidelines are not a license and do not constitute approval or authorization of any fan productions or a waiver of any rights that CBS or Paramount Pictures may have with respect to fan fiction created outside of these guidelines.
  • 23 Jun 2016
    The newest Trek films are part of the first wave of movies Paramount will release on the new UltraHD Blu-ray format. There are no new special features, they’re the same as The Compendium deluxe two-movie release from a couple of years back, but at least nothing is left out (I’m looking at you first versions of Into Darkness). Into Darkness is an especially good fit considering parts of it were filmed in IMAX. Read on to find out how the movies look and sound with the next generation video and audio formats. A few words about UltraHD Blu-ray and HDR UltraHD Blu-ray is the next generation version of Blu-ray, since it is made for UltraHD resolution (4k) it has to hold quite a bit more data, and so it is not backwards compatible. To play an UltraHD Blu-ray Disc (UHD BD) you must have a new player made for it. UHD BD is much more than just a resolution bump, since the increase in resolution alone is often not really discernible for people at typical TV sizes and seating distances. The real “killer features” of the UHD BD standard are High Dynamic Range (HDR) and a Wide Color Gamut (WCG). This is something you can see at normal distances, because it has to do with contrast and color, both things our eyes are rather keen on detecting. A new 4k transfer of a movie graded for HDR/WCG can in effect digitally “describe” a film in more detail than we’ve had in a consumer format before. Now to display all this new information, you’ll need a newer Ultra HDTV that can understand how to present the new high dynamic range and wider color information. If you bought a mid-range or high-end 2015 model Ultra HDTV you may simply need a firmware upgrade (which was probably automatically applied already). However, for most people that means getting a brand new HDR-capable set. While you can theoretically buy an UltraHD Blu-ray player and hook it up to an older non-HDR compliant 4k or even 1080p TV set, this is not recommended, you don’t gain any of the real benefits from the new format, and in fact the UHD BD version may look somewhat worse, because of the greater extremes in contrast that a regular HDTV is not really able to handle. As you might imagine this is something that has to be seen, it can’t very easily be conveyed via images. It really is something you have to see for yourself in a proper setup. More info about this new tech can be found here: http://www.cnet.com/news/what-is-hdr-for-tvs-and-why-should-you-care/ http://www.uhdalliance.org/consumers/ http://uhdbdinnumbers.com/ NOTE: Due to the fact that UHD BDs are not usable in a standard Blu-ray PC drive, there is no way to capture the output of UHD Blu-ray discs, and even if it were possible, the output wouldn’t do it justice. There are a few images in this article, simply for illustrative purposes. The images are from the standard Blu-ray discs and are not indicative of the quality of the UltraHD Blu-ray versions. Dolby Atmos Atmos is a relatively new surround sound standard that is a large technical leap forward from typical surround sound formats. Atmos consists of sound objects that are positioned in 3D space around the listener, it is then up to the decoder in your A/V receiver to handle what speaker(s) these sounds comes from given the number of speakers you have and your room setup. Contrast this to typical surround sound formats which are entirely channel based, a sound is strictly mapped to one of 5 or 7 channels. Atmos has been in use theatrically since 2012 and available in a home version since 2014. This year, Atmos decoding has become a fairly standard feature for mid-range A/V receivers.  The home version uses 2 or 4 height speakers, which can be accomplished a few different ways. You can mount more speakers up high near the ceiling, you can put speakers in or on the ceiling, or you can use specially made Atmos speakers, or Atmos add-on modules to existing speakers, which bounce the height information off the ceiling from the standard front and rear surround speaker positions. For the best results you’ll want to use 4 speakers, two speakers will leave the listener with more of a squished bubble of sound that stops at a certain point, rather than enveloping the listener. Atmos soundtracks are backwards compatible with Dolby TrueHD, so if you’re not ready to make the leap, you’ll get an excellent 7.1/5.1 version for standard speaker layouts. Atmos has been available on select Blu-ray releases since late-2014, however since it is considered a bit of a premium feature, there is a new trend to move the Atmos mixes to the UltraHD Blu-ray releases, which are also considered premium, leaving the standard Blu-ray with only a conventional 7.1 mix. Star Trek (2009) Star Trek was filmed in 2008 just before the big push to film movies in IMAX and exploit other newer digital cinema technologies (like 3D). It was also considered a fantastic Blu-ray getting high marks for audio and video quality when it was released in 2010, but that was 6 years ago. Because of this I assume this is the movie most people wonder what kind of an upgrade they’re getting by going to UltraHD and HDR with Dolby Atmos surround sound. Video The first film in the new franchise is a very different film than its sequel, both in the sense that it was filmed entirely on 35mm film and that it has a more intimate feel than its slam bang follow up. There is a definite upgrade thanks to the increased dynamic range and wider color gamut that UltraHD Blu-ray affords. The scene with the Kelvin shuttlecraft escaping in silhouette across a bright sun is a more powerful scene, with details in the bright star more visible and the shuttles more sharply defined, rather than the sheer brightness drowning out the image. The higher dynamic range is evident in this manner all throughout the film. Perhaps the biggest benefit to being able to...
  • 11 Jun 2016

    Die Mannschaft der Enterprise erwacht aus einem kollektiven Blackout, nachdem das Schiff ein Wurmloch passiert hat. Es scheint, als würden der Mannschaft 40 Sekunden fehlen. Doch es ergeben sich allerlei Hinweise darauf, dass die gesamte Besatzung deutlich länger bewußtlos war. Ihr Misstrauen wird umso größer, als sie bemerken, dass Data sich merkwürdig verhält. Alles deutet […]

    The post 4.14 TNG Blu-ray Review: Beweise (Clues) appeared first on Star Trek HD.

  • 24 May 2016

    Drei verschiedene Kinoposter sind bislang zum dreizehnten Film erschienen. Ein neues internationales Plakat zu Star Trek Beyond, dass auch in deutschen Kinos aushängen wird, fällt sehr farbenfroh aus. Abgebildet sind die Charaktere Kirk, Jaylah, Spock, Uhura, Scotty und der neue Gegenspieler Krall. Ein anderes Filmplakat wirbt schlicht mit dem Schriftzug „Beyond“ und verzichtet auf den […]

    The post Star Trek Beyond: Die Kinoposter zum Film appeared first on Star Trek HD.

  • 21 May 2016

    Das Warten hat ein Ende. Am Freitagabend zeigte Paramount Pictures während eines großen Fan-Events den Trailer zu Star Trek Beyond. Der Film von Regisseur Justin Lin kommt am 21. Juli weltweit in die Kinos. Update: Der Trailer in deutscher Sprache Im Rahmen eines exklusiven Fan-Events gaben Produzent J.J. Abrams, Regisseur Justin Lin sowie die Schauspieler […]

    The post Star Trek Beyond Trailer ist da! appeared first on Star Trek HD.

Forgotten Trek Latest Posts
  • 22 Mar 2016
    Happy 85th birthday to the best Captain in Starfleet; past, present, future, alternate future, alternate universe and beyond! He doesn't let age slow him down, and we wish him many more.
    Now would be a good time to revisit some of the many posts here devoted to The Shat by clicking here!
  • 20 Jan 2016
    DeForest Kelly's birthday is today, January 20th. This true Southern gentleman (born in Taccoa, GA) never let the lights of Hollywood get in his eyes and change him from the kind and humble man he was.
    Here is a link to all the posts on this blog that are tagged with his name. A great way to celebrate his memory!

    Bonus: a behind-the-scenes photo of Kelley getting his old-age makeup applied for "The Deadly Years." He had a great time acting in this episode as he took his "crusty old country doctor" persona to the ultimate level!

  • 28 Dec 2015
    Lovely Nichelle Nichols is 83 today. We hope she has a wonderful day of love and appreciation, and that her New Year has much health and happiness. We love you, Nichelle!
    Celebrate by reading some or all of the entries I have made of the past few years, right here.
  • 07 Dec 2015
    On this date in 1979, Star Trek: The Motion Picture premiered across the country. How well I remember the excitement that I, and many other fans, felt! It was to us back then, what the new Star Wars movie is to fans this December. Today's post is devoted to the memories we have of this red-letter date in Trek history. Read a few, a lot, or all of the ST:TMP related posts I have made on this blog by clicking here.

  • 14 Sep 2015
    Today, September 14th, is Walter "Chekov" Koenig's 79th birthday. Hope he has a great one!

    In honor of everyone's favorite Russian accident-prone screamer, read over all the previous posts about Walter from this blog!

  • 14 Jul 2015
    Mike Minor made some significant artistic and production design contributions to the original series third season, the aborted Phase 2 series, ST: The Motion Picture and ST II: The Wrath of Khan. In this extensive interview from issue #14 of Enterprise Incidents, published February of 1984, we find out the extent of his involvement. (See his Star Trek wiki page here.) As you may recall, I posted another article on Mike earlier from Starlog, but this one goes much more in-depth. He worked on many other genre productions, not the least of which was Star Wars. It's tragic that he passed away so young in 1987 and we never got to see what he might have done since then.
    (Click on images to enlarge. Once open, you may have to click again to view full-size.)
    Bonus: from the same issue of EI, comes this fan drawing of the Mutara Nebula battle.

    Bonus #2: Publicity photo of Kirk once again baffling Spock with his propensity for somehow inexplicably winning against the Vulcan.
    "How does he DO that?"
birdofthegalaxy's Photos @ Flickr
TrekCore Videos @ YouTube
TrekCore Latest Updates
  • 24 Jun 2016
    Award-winning mega-star Rihanna will be contributing a new song to the STAR TREK BEYOND soundtrack when the film releases this summer, as the news of the upcoming single arrived on the iTunes store last night.
  • 23 Jun 2016
    Bryan Fuller, showrunner and head writer of CBS's 2017 "Star Trek" television revival, revealed some details about the behind-the-scenes build-up to the upcoming series - and also shot down some often-heard rumors about the setting and format of the new "Trek" show.
  • 23 Jun 2016
    Bryan Fuller, head writer and showrunner of next January’s Star Trek television revival, revealed some details – some we suspected, but others new – about the upcoming series to Collider at last night’s Saturn Awards event.
  • 23 Jun 2016
    Ever since the first STAR TREK BEYOND teaser trailer arrived in December, eagle-eyed fans have been speculating about changes to the Enterprise digital model - and a new interview with the film's visual effects supervisor goes into great detail on not just the revised starship, but also the bredth of CGI work that's gone into this summer's new film.
  • 22 Jun 2016
    We've got a new gallery up tonight, in memory of recently-deceased "Star Trek" actor Anton Yelchin - a collection of rarely-seen photos of the late actor from throughout his career.

24
June

1932 Scott Marlowe is born.
1947 Peter Weller is born. Mick Fleetwood is born.
1958 Tommy "Tiny" Lister, Jr. is born.
1966 Third day of filming on TOS: "The Man Trap". The climax scene in McCoy's quarters is filmed today.
1967 Story outline submitted for the undeveloped Original Series episode "The Lost Star" by John Meredyth Lucas. Story outline submitted for the undeveloped Original Series episode "Shol" by Darlene Hartman.
1968 Fourth day of filming on TOS: "The Enterprise Incident". Final draft script for TOS: "And the Children Shall Lead" is revised.
1972 The Thirtieth UK Story Arc continues in Valiant & TV21 #39 with the sixth of nine installments.
1987 Eighteenth day of filming on TNG: "Encounter at Farpoint".
1991 Forty-ninth day of filming on Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. Bridge scenes are filmed today.
1993 Final draft script for TNG: "Descent, Part II" is submitted.
1996 Fifty-fifth day of filming on Star Trek: First Contact. CIC Video begins its rerelease of Star Trek: The Original Series on VHS in the UK with volume 1.1.
1997 Brian Keith dies.
1998 Sixty-first day of filming on Star Trek: Insurrection.
2002 Paramount Home Entertainment releases Next Generation volume 5.1 and Enterprise volume 1.4 on VHS in the UK.

View tomorrow's page

Memory Alpha New Articles
  • 14 Jun 2016
    Presented below is the complete set of final prices realized for the 152 lots of Star Trek memorabilia, principally consisting of assorted sketches from the collection of award winning Star Trek Costume Designer Robert Blackman, that were offered in the Propworx Star Trek Auction VIII event; which concluded on Saturday June 4th in a live online bidding session hosted through LiveAuctioneers.com.

    The following values shown are the high bids witnessed on the items and do not include the 23% buyers premium ...

  • 22 May 2016
    A spectacular exhibition of screen used props, costumes, starship filming models, and set fixtures that is rich in Original Series memorabilia and spans the entire Star Trek franchise - representing perhaps the most impressive collection of Star Trek production artifacts ever assembled for public display - opened its doors yesterday at the EMP Museum in downtown Seattle, Washington. The special exhibit, called "Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds" will run for just over 9 months from May 21st until Feb. 27, 2017 and features more than 100 rare artifacts and high-tech video displays, all presented in a highly appealing labyrinth-like floor layout which is accented by bright orange rock-like pillars and structures that evoke what one might expect to encounter on a TOS landing party exploration mission. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a stunning display consisting of Captain Kirk's Command Chair and the restored Helm and Navigations Console from the Original Series Desilu Bridge set arranged in the same orientation as they appeared together in all 79 classic TOS episodes, and presented alongside a pair of Starfleet uniforms worn by William Shatner and DeForest Kelley. In a nearby display case, the costumes of Leonard Nimoy and Nichelle Nichols are shown with some original TOS Bridge control panels, and an adjacent case presents a group of rare screen used TOS hand props - together on public display as a set for the first time ever - that includes a Tricorder, a Phaser Pistol, a Communicator, a Hypospray, and a Medical Scanner. In addition to all of the rare memorabilia on hand, the exhibit even provides several photo-op areas where visitors can pose in a replica of the Original Series Captain's Chair, can record footage of themselves re-creating William Shatner's iconic "Khaaaaaaan!" scream in a special booth, or be "beamed up" in a mock Transporter set. And fans can even crawl through a recreation of a Jefferies tube along with many other interactive experiences.

    Presented below is an extensive collection of photographs that document the exhibit in wonderful detail. These photos were selected from several large online galleries that were published by the websites SeattleRefined.com, SeattleTimes.com (Credit: Brady Harvey), king5.com (for Western Washington's NBC televison station affiliate K5), and bellinghamherald.com (Credit: Elaine Thompson of Associated Press) as part of their coverage of the opening of "Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds".

    Detailed information about the EMP Museum and its complete set of exhibits, along with a storefront to purchase admission tickets to the Star Trek and all other attractions, can be found at: http://www.empmuseum.org/

    Especially for Original Series fans, this exhibition represents a historic opportunity to personally view some incredible artifacts of the first and finest series in the franchise as they have never been presented together before!

Inside Star Trek Latest Posts
  • 14 Mar 2015
    A prop energy pistol featured in Star Trek: Insurrection for use by characters portraying the Son’a. The item is sturdy molded foam rubber painted black, metallic silver, and gold. The pistol shows signs of wear from production use. Several areas on the item depict rubbing and paint flaking off. The item is rigid but has some give and measures approx. 8 X 7 X 1.5 inches.

    Like the Son'a shotgun the pistol was designed by Ed Natividad. He was both a storyboard and conceptual artist for Star Wars Episode I and II. As a conceptual artist he helped shape the look of Episode I's architectural elements, costumes and weaponry.

    Ed started working at George Lucas' special effects company Industrial Light & Magic in 1994. His work in the film industry has been on various productions such as Star Wars: Episodes I & II, Armageddon, Batman & Robin, Forrest Gump, Matrix II & III and Terminator 3, Transformers and many of the major blockbuster films.

  • 26 Dec 2014
    A screen used vest worn by members of the Maquis. The Maquis were a rebellious organization of Federation-born colonists and discontented Starfleet officers who organized against the Cardassian occupation of their homes in the Demilitarized Zone after their colonies were ceded to the Cardassian Union by Federation Cardassian Treaties in the late 2360s and early 2370s. Starfleet Command considered members of the Maquis to be traitors, while Cardassia considered the Maquis to be terrorists.

    The vest was worn by actor John Franklyn Robbins in his role as Macias throughout the episode "Preemptive strike" of Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1994. Macias was a citizen of Juhraya, a Federation colony that came under Cardassian rule after a treaty was signed with the Federation. He was the leader of a Maquis cell that opposed the treaty. Macias become a friend with Ro Laren who joins the Maquis in "Preemptive Strike".

    The vest was also used on the set of Voyager by stunt actor Steve Blalock. In the episode "Worst Case Scenario" he plays a Maquis rebel, too. The production team added a velcro patch to the vest for a Starfleet combadge.

  • 17 Nov 2014
    Deleted scene with the new Klingons from Star Trek (2009) © Paramount Pictures
    The Klingon baldric was a sash that traditionally went over the left or right shoulder of noble Klingons. It contained the symbol of a Klingon House or it was used to hold knives and disruptors. In 2009 the look of the famous alien warriors was redesigned by costume designer Michael Kaplan for J.J. Abrams' reboot of Star Trek.

    The Klingons wear helmets and grey thick coats with a large black baldric. Kaplan described them as his favorite costumes for the film, explaining he modeled the helmets on a horseshoe crab, while the coats were intended to resemble the texture of an elephant or rhinoceros. The baldric is made of leather. The outer layer is calf skin. Two snaps and velcro are mounted inside to fasten the baldric.

    Unfortunately the scenes with the new Klingons set on Rura Penthe were cut in Star Trek. Director J.J. Abrams tried to avoid a disruption of narrative flow. But the Klingons returned in the sequel Star Trek Into Darkness (2013). Michael Kaplan revised the costumes again. Although the Klingons got new outfits with a different kind of baldric you can see a Klingon with a black baldric which was designed for its predecessor.

    Klingons in Star Trek Into Darkness © Paramount Pictures

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