Star Trek Voyager (VOY) Season 2

Season 1 - Season 2 - Season 3 - Season 4 - Season 5 - Season 6 - Season 7

The 37's - Initiations - Projections - Elogium - Non Sequitur - Twisted - Parturition
Persistence of Vision - Tattoo - Cold Fire - Maneuvers - Resistance - Prototype
 Alliances - Threshold - Meld - Dreadnought - Death Wish - Lifesigns - Investigations
Deadlock - Innocence - The Thaw - Tuvix - Resolutions - Basics I/II

 

The 37's

Synopsis

Stardate 48975.1: Voyager discovers an ancient automobile from Earth adrift in space, and picks up an old SOS signal coming from a nearby planet. Janeway decides to land the ship, since it is not possible to beam down or use shuttles. Inside a cave, the crew finds several stasis chambers with humans and revives them. Among them is flight pioneer Amelia Earhart, who mysteriously vanished in 1937. Suddenly the away team is attacked. But the attackers turn out to be human settlers, who live on the planet. Their ancestors were abducted by the Briori centuries ago just like Earhart and the other "37's", but eventually expelled their captors in a rebellion. Janeway leaves it to the crew to join the human civilization on the planet or return to the ship. Eventually all crew members decide to continue the journey home.

Commentary

I have reservations against Star Trek stories that blend in urban myths or conspiracy theories. Fortunately, when I first watched this episode, I had not seen or read any spoilers, and so I could enjoy it unbiased. Because it is a great story, and Voyager's best one so far besides the pilot. In many ways the theme is reminiscent of TNG: "The Neutral Zone". But I don't mind the similarities, because "The 37's" corrects some grave mistakes of the TNG episode. Most importantly Voyager's crew treats the people from the 20th century with the respect they deserve, and not like the cavemen that Picard saw in them. We only have to wonder if the "37's" had received the same degree of attention if not Amelia Earhart had been among them. Well, and while the chemistry between Kate Mulgrew and guest star Sharon Lawrence as Amelia Earhart works very well and bears importance for the story, I think that the mutual admiration and pleasantries of the two women are a bit overdone.

Overall, this story plays very nice anyway. There are no conflicts with the sole exception of the initial confrontation with the human settlers that lasts only two or three minutes. I think that, as a two-part episode, "The 37's" would have been a perfect season 1 finale and season 2 premiere. I would have liked to see something of the human cities. I would have liked to see Janway in doubt about her mission to return to the Alpha Quadrant at any cost. I would have liked to see conflicts among the crew about whether to stay or to leave. I would have liked to see Amelia Earhart fly the ship. I would have liked to see some sort of love affair, maybe Paris falling in love with a resident beauty. And perhaps it should have been criticized at one point in the story that the humans were unnecessarily cruel when they expelled the Briori (which will become a topic in an otherwise similar story in ENT: "North Star"). There was so much potential for more. Anyway, the episode is only 45 minutes long, of which not a single moment is wasted.

Coming back to my general apprehension, in "The 37's" Star Trek deals with the otherwise popular "alien abduction" theme for the very first time, and I appreciate that it is not mystified like in other sci-fi and mystery series. There is a perfectly rational explanation for everything, although we are not shown any traces of the Briori.

The most important outcome of the episode in my view is that Voyager has become a hospitable place since the ship first arrived in the Delta Quadrant. No one leaves the ship despite the prospect of a pleasant life on the Briori planet. The crew makes a conscious and unanimous decision to continue the journey, unlike the one that Janeway made for the whole crew in "Caretaker". This should boost morale for the rest of the journey, however long it takes.

Annotations

Rating: 8

 

Initiations

Synopsis

Stardate 49005.3: Chakotay is alone on a shuttle when he is suddenly attacked by a small Kazon vessel. Chakotay manages to outmaneuver and destroy the attacking vessel and rescues its pilot, a teenage Kazon boy named Kar, who was attempting to earn his name in battle. The two are captured by the Kazon-Ogla, however. On the Kazon ship, First Maje Razik wants Chakotay to execute Kar for his failure. But Chakotay points the gun at Razik and escapes together with Kar. The two have to abandon the heavily damaged shuttle and beam themselves onto the surface of a moon that serves as a Kazon training ground. In the meantime Janeway has arrived with an away team, but Razik and his people lure them into a trap and find Chakotay and the boy first. Chakotay gives Kar the chance to earn Razik's respect by shooting at him in the front of Razik. Kar, however, chooses to kill Razik instead, thereby earning his Ogla name.

Commentary

"Iniiations" comes with a good deal of action, but I don't find this episode very compelling, although I can't tell exactly why. Maybe it's the repeated theme of Chakotay saving Kar's life and of the two running away. Maybe it's because Chakotay's composure and preachiness and Kar's sometimes overplayed defiance remain invariable throughout almost the complete episode and become bothersome after a while.

While I don't like Chakotay (in this episode) and Kar so much as single characters, their interaction works well though, just because Chakotay is so imperturbable that he finally manages to evoke some change in Kar. Chakotay probably isn't sure in the end whether he should rather congratulate Kar for having earned his name, or whether he should be sorry for an unnecessary death. For Chakotay the story has a satisfactory outcome because his efforts to save Kar and himself (in this order?) were successful, but it certainly isn't a peaceful one because Kar has made the first step to rise the ranks in the Ogla hierarchy, thanks to the Starfleet officer with an even clearer concept of friends and enemies than before. Chakotay would have preferred to convince the boy to leave the Kazon (a bit like Picard initially tried in TNG: "Suddenly Human"), but I think that goal was an unrealistic one in the first place.

Rather than the action, I like how the story provides insight into the Kazon culture. The people in charge of Voyager tried hard to establish differences between the Kazon and their much better known cousins from the Alpha Quadrant, the Klingons. I think they finally managed in this story to give them disctinctiveness. The Kazon don't have a tradition as a proud warrior race; they were slaves of the Trabe until 26 years ago and they must still try to find their way. The Kazon have not managed to build anything like an empire; they are composed of various sects that fight each other and whose territorial claims change every day. And perhaps most notably, the Kazon idea of "honor" is a rather crude one. Kar has to kill an enemy to earn his name. Bad enough, but the enemy may be even his own maje, or is it only the gratitude of the new maje why it is accepted in his case? Anyway, the Kazon leave anything but a distinguished impression, which ultimately sets them apart from the Klingons.

Annotations

Rating: 4

 

Projections

Synopsis

Stardate 48892.1: The Doctor is activated during a Kazon attack, only to find that the crew has left the ship. B'Elanna, however, arrives in sickbay, telling the Doctor that Janeway needs medical aid on the bridge. She transfers his program to the bridge, which is possible thanks to newly installed holoemitters. He then helps Neelix to fend off a Kazon attacker in the mess hall, upon which he discovers that he is bleeding. The Doctor examines himself and registers as a lifeform on the tricorder, whereas everyone else doesn't. Lt. Barclay from Jupiter Station appears, telling the Doctor that he is actually Lewis Zimmerman, a human engineer working on the station and married to a woman named Kes. According to Barclay, Zimmerman is trapped in his holodeck creation of a starship named Voyager. Barclay tries to convince the Doctor that he can only escape the illusion if he ends the program by destroying the ship. On the real starship Voyager, the crew succeed in isolating the Doctor's program, which was trapped on the holodeck after a kinoplasmic radiation surge.

Commentary

Unusual situations, sudden twists, unexpected revelations. That is what I always like to see in Star Trek and what this episode has plenty of. The story focuses on the Doctor. Other crew members have only few lines, if any. This is not a deficiency though.

The beginning points to a rather conventional plot. It seems that the Kazon have attacked the ship, and the Doctor doesn't manage to contact the other crew members who have apparently used the escape pods. At this point it all seems like a variation of TOS: "The Mark of Gideon" or TNG: "Remember" and draws suspense from the mystery of why everyone else is gone. There are some cues that the problem at hand is not the Kazon attack. Why isn't the tricorder working when the Doctor examines B'Elanna? Why are there suddenly holoemitters in other rooms besides sickbay? These cues are subtle enough not to impede the deception, neither for the Doctor nor for the viewer. The next hint that something is wrong is the Kazon in the mess hall. How could he get on the ship (without transporter), and if he managed to come aboard, why are there no other Kazon?

After about 13 minutes in which the Doctor tends to the problems of the crippled ship (with an atmosphere much like in TNG: "Disaster") and which are about to become boring, the story takes an unexpected turn when the Doctor bleeds, which is the most definite cue that this story isn't about a Kazon attack at all. Now the Doctor finds more and more evidence that he is a real human being and that everyone else is only a simulation. And the ultimate confirmation seems to come from Lt. Barclay (Dwight Schultz), who puts forward very good points that the Doctor is actually Lewis Zimmerman. I like how Barclay provides comic relief here. One might say that the whole idea of a hologram in an identity crisis has all the potential for a comedy, but this story deals with the Doctor's problems in a serious fashion and uses Barclay in a way not to detract from it. It was worthwhile to get Schultz for a guest appearance, and even a bit ironic, since his character Barclay himself had trouble distinguishing illusion and reality in TNG: "Hollow Pursuits".

Barclay draws the Doctor into a discussion that seems to revolve around technical aspects and that comes with the usual Technobabble. But ultimately their debate is about nothing less than the question of the Doctor's very nature, much like in the extraordinary TNG episode "Frame of Mind", where Riker's identity was challenged. The doubt about his own nature also raises the question if, in lack of evidence to the contrary, a simulation may be just as valid as the physical reality. In other words, since the Doctor, as a self-aware entity, can't tell in his current situation whether he is a hologram or a real human being, doesn't that automatically qualify him as a real lifeform? if this is so, the same should apply to Dr. Moriarty, who may still be exploring the galaxy as hinted at in "Ship in the Bottle", under the impression that his adventures are real (and whose being human was fostered by Reginal Barclay as well).

I just love how Barclay, in an effort to prove that it is just a simulation, rewinds the program to the events of "Caretaker". Attentive viewers immediately recognize this as a flashback, at latest when the Doctor requests a tricorder from Kim and the ensign hands him a standard device upon which the Doctor states more precisely, "Medical tricorder".

Another nice idea is to make Kes the Doctor's alleged wife in real life, possibly reflecting the Doctor's wishes at that time. What if all the formerly real people are actually holograms and vice versa? For some time, one could really believe that the whole Voyager story is only a holodeck program, similar as it would be done again in DS9: "Far Beyond the Stars". Chakotay's appearance marks another turning point. Just when the Doctor is almost convinced that he is Lewis Zimmerman, he is suddenly faced with a different, equally probable explanation. Much like Riker in "Frame of Mind". In a manner of speaking, the resolution in the Voyager episode is similar, since the difference between the manipulation of a human mind and of a computer program is not that big. Regarding the idea of a simulation inside the simulation, this is something we have seen before in the already mentioned TNG: "Ship in a Bottle". Although there is no actual second simulation, the very idea of it and the Doctor's confusion about it adds another level of complexity when it comes to destroying the simulation inside the simulation and its unknown outcome. This is all handled very skillfully in the story.

As I mentioned, the episode is full of twists, but the final one may have been one too many. The Doctor wakes up in sickbay and we are led to believe that everything is fine now - although a look at the clock reveals that the episode still lasts six or seven minutes. The way that Kes mutates from a caring nurse to Zimmerman's obsessive wife wasn't a good idea in my view. It adds a superfluous chapter to an episode that is well-rounded until now.

Another point of criticism is that once again the holodeck turns out to be a dangerous place for human beings and holograms alike. On the other hand, I have to admit that, considering that the holodeck safeties (for human beings!) do not malfunction this time, it is a bit like a parody on such a kind of stories.

Annotations

Rating: 8

 

Elogium

Synopsis

Stardate 48921.3: Voyager encounters a swarm of space-dwelling lifeforms. The electrophoretic activity in their presence triggers a premature elogium, the Ocampa maturation process, in Kes. It is the only phase in her short lifespan to conceive a child, and this puts Neelix under pressure too. The ship is trapped in the swarm, and Janeway decides against using violence to escape. It turns out that the members of the swarm mistake the ship for a mating partner, and as a bigger lifeform apparently of the other sex shows up, the situation is resolved by mimicking a gesture of humility. Kes' elogium was only a false alarm, and she will still be able to conceive a child at a later time.

Commentary

The all-dominating theme of this episode is relationships, procreation and parenthood. It pervades all sub-plots of the story on various levels. And this becomes the more annoying the longer I watch the episode. The opening scene with the two crew members kissing in the turbolift is only the beginning. In the following, the story spotlights the so far underdeveloped relationship of Kes and Neelix, Kes' apparent elogium, the idea of having children on the ship in general, and finally Ensign Wildman's pregnancy. And on the top of everything the space-dwelling lifeforms apparently want to have sex with Voyager, in a plot thread that is almost a carbon copy of TNG: "Galaxy's Child", with the only difference that it's about mating instead of milking this time. There is way too much variation of the same theme packed into one contrived story.

While I generally like the idea that an aspect of one thread is mirrored in another one, everything is strangely entangled with each other in this episode, far beyond a reasonable and credible extent. The fact that Kes' fertile phase is triggered by the horny space lifeforms is only the most obvious example. The most annoying one is that Neelix is jealous about Kes spending time with Tom, while the big space-dwelling creature is jealous about Voyager attracting possible mating partners.

Neelix is a nuisance in this episode anyway. In the first season there were rather few occasions that showed Neelix as Kes' caring life partner. And now that the writers remember the couple they have Neelix mutate to an inveterate macho who is jealous about other men that only talk to his girl, who adheres to antiquated gender stereotypes and who wusses out when it comes to the decision of having a baby. We may argue that this behavior is in character, but it just doesn't suit the story and ultimately turns an episode that should rightfully focus on Kes into a Neelix show.

Regarding Kes herself and her condition, at some point it is not interesting any more to see and hear about the various unappetizing side effects of her elogium. And Jennifer Lien's acting comes across as unintentionally funny at times.

On the bright side, we learn a great deal about Kes and about Ocampa biology and culture. But it is not really credible that such a hurry is necessary to impregnate Kes and that the whole procedure is so awfully complicated. The idea of Ocampa procreation as put forward here is just as contrived as the whole story.

So I don't like "Elogium", and it was my least favorite Voyager episode for some time, even after the one arguably worse episode of the second season (guess which one!) had already aired.

Annotations

Rating: 1

 

Non Sequitur

Synopsis

Stardate 49011.0: Harry Kim is on a shuttle whose hull is going to breach, waiting for an emergency beam-out. The next moment, he finds himself in San Francisco, in bed with his fiancée Libby. It appears Harry was transferred to a parallel reality where Voyager disappeared without him and in which he has developed the engines for a new type of runabout, the Yellowstone class. Harry tries to get accustomed with his situation but eventually decides to do something to change it. He uses his security code to access classified data on Voyager, and he finds out that Tom Paris too isn't on the ship. Harry visits Tom in Marseille, but Tom, who doesn't know Harry in this reality, isn't interested in joining him to get back to Voyager. Back in San Francisco, Harry is put under surveillance for breaking into the classified files. He finds support in Cosimo, an alien from a temporal anomaly who poses as a coffee shop owner. Cosimo hands Harry a storage chip with data on the anomaly that might take him back to his reality. While tampering with the monitoring device on his leg, Harry triggers an alarm. Tom unexpectedly appears as Harry is chased by Starfleet Security. The two steal the runabout prototype and head for the anomaly that caused the timeline change, in the hope of exactly reproducing the conditions that displaced Harry. They succeed when Tom beams out Harry just as the runabout is breaking apart. In the end, Harry is in the shuttle in the Delta Quadrant again and is rescued through an emergency beam-out. 

Commentary

Star Trek has a long history of putting characters into "what if" scenarios. So far these scenarios either turned out a fake (holodeck simulation or messing with the brain), or a temporal accident changed the life of the character for the worse in a way that there was an obvious need to fix it. "Non Sequitur" is a departure from this traditional pattern. In the new reality Harry finds what appears to be a better life than out in the Delta Quadrant, especially considering that the young ensign, fresh from the Academy, is usually the crew member with the most enthusiasm about any slim chance to return to the Alpha Quadrant. So what could be bad about him being in San Francisco again, with his girl-friend Libby and a pleasant life far from the dangers of the Starship Voyager?

At first it seems that the confused Harry, after the customary verification that everything is really happening and not an illusion created by aliens, just needs to adjust to his new life. He would have to catch up with eight months of work on the starship engines, and with eight months of his relationship with Libby. That doesn't seem to be too hard. But Harry feels remorse about those at whose expense he now has a better life: his friend Daniel Byrd, who went missing with Voyager in his place, and Tom Paris, who after his releae from the penal colony ended up as a drunkard in Sandrine's Bar (the real one) instead of doing something useful with his new freedom.

Harry seems to care a lot about other people's well-being, which he cites as the main reason for him to go and fix the timeline. But thinking further about it, Harry may be doing it just as well and perhaps chiefly for himself. He wanted the job on Voyager but his request was turned down in this reality. The engine project was only his second choice, perhaps even as a defiant reaction. He wanted to go out into space and would have been away for months or even years anyway, so he may have taken into account a break-up instead of getting engaged with Libby. His palpable lack of familiarity and trust with Libby is probably only partly attributed to his confusion but also to the fact that being with her may not be quite that big a dream that has come true for him. At least, I could imagine other characters who would act very differently in this admittedly weird situation.

The story is successful in showing that Harry just doesn't belong in this reality, including his relationship with Libby. Still, I wish the character relationships, and especially the one with Libby had been worked out better. Libby comes across as pretty one-dimensional, reduced to saying lines such as "Harry, what's wrong with you?" Harry's unsympathetic colleague Lasca could have been removed from the story altogether. He only provides cues for the startled Harry. Also, Lasca's presence as a low-ranking engineer during Harry's interrogation on delicate security matters (perhaps in an effort to boost the importance of the character) makes absolutely no sense. Although Cosimo is a lot more pleasant and interesting, I am not very content with this character either. It is rather anticlimactic that after the revelation that he is an alien all he does is giving Harry a data chip, with the hint that he can't help him a lot. Also, too often in Star Trek mysterious aliens are responsible for something that could have been a natural phenomenon just as well.

Overall, the episode is not totally convincing, but the interesting premise and implications with the insight into Harry's potential "normal" life with his girl-friend in San Francisco more than compensates for the shortcomings of the story.

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Twisted

Synopsis

Stardate not given: While many of the bridge crew are on the holodeck to celebrate Kes' second birthday, Voyager runs into a spatial distortion. The anomaly causes the directions of corridors to change so no one can find the right way through the ship. The holodeck on deck 6 is still unaffected but the anomaly will soon pervade the whole ship. Captain Janeway suffers a shock when her arm gets caught in the advancing distortion field. Against Tuvok's advice, Chakotay decides to emit a warp pulse to repel the anomaly and restore the ship as it was. But this attempt is in vain. As all options are exhausted and the field has already entered the holodeck, Tuvok recommends to do nothing, and Chakotay agrees. The whole crew, including Janeway, remains unharmed as the anomaly passes through them. It turns out that it was the attempt of an unknown intelligence to communicate with the ship.

Commentary

The story of "Twisted" is just as much about character relationships as about the spatial anomaly, and the former compensates a bit for the countless weaknesses of the latter. It is a true "family" episode in which every member of the cast has a couple of good scenes. I especially like the interaction between Janeway and Kim, between Tuvok and Chakotay and between the Doctor and Kes. Only Neelix' jealousy is once again immoderate (and will hit its low in the following episode, "Parturition"). Although it is clichéd how everyone plays nice in the face of their possible death, I find it touching how Chakotay tries to come to terms with Tuvok's logic, and B'Elanna with Chakotay's spirituality. Overall, I enjoy this part of the story, but it can't save the episode.

The idea that an anomaly may distort the ship without ripping it apart is weird to start with. Weird things happen in Star Trek all the time, and I usually enjoy them a lot. But in "Twisted" it just doesn't work for me. What's happening to Voyager is geometrically impossible no matter how much I twist my mind; I never really manage to suspend my disbelief. Also, after perhaps five or ten minutes the idea of crew members who are wandering about the ship and think they are getting mad isn't interesting any longer. Lines such as "It's reconfiguring the ship" are repeated ad nauseam, and the directing is bland considering that something outrageous is going on. And the revelation that the anomaly was created by a lifeform that doesn't know how to say hello to the crew (but how to operate the computer and re-engineer the ship) is extremely lame, considering that it is one of the most overused concepts in Star Trek and totally gratuitous here. So this part of the story fails on more than just the scientific and logical level.

The only redeeming quality of the anomaly story lies in the irony that for once doing nothing is the correct course of action, and that of all places on the ship the holodeck is safest one.

Annotations

Rating: 2

 

Parturition

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Neelix is increasingly jealous of Tom, who spends much time with Kes. Their conflict culminates in a fight involving hair pasta and sauce in the mess hall and is only stopped when Captain Janeway calls from her ready room. Janeway wants the two to take a shuttle to a Class-M planet that has a volatile atmosphere ("Planet Hell") but where she hopes to find rich food supplies. During their descent into the atmosphere Neelix and Paris lose contact with Voyager and crash onto the surface. They seek refuge in a nearby cave whose entrance they seal off because the vapors in the planet's atmosphere are harmful. In the meantime, Voyager is attacked by an unknown alien starship that remains in a position closer to the planet in a way to protect something on the surface. Inside the cave, Paris and Neelix witness the birth of a reptohumanoid alien. They decide to take care of the hatchling whose condition is deteriorating. Tom recognizes that the hatchling needs to breathe the vapors outside the cave. Using a transport window of just a couple of minutes, Tom and Neelix are beamed up to Voyager just as an adult reptohumamoid appears to tend to the baby.

Commentary

I never liked this episode, mainly because of the childish "pasta battle" and other awkwardly comical situations. As I watch it again after several years I have to admit that there is a bit more seriousness to the story than I remembered. Besides the Paris-Neelix conflict we have also got Tom who speaks to Harry about his feelings for Kes, and Kes who unexpectedly receives advice on relationships from the Doctor. I like these single scenes, but overall everything is too episodic and too formulaic, a bit like in a sitcom. Only the canned laughter is missing.

The story and also the directing becomes better after the shuttle crash. I appreciate how Tom and Neelix behave like adult people from now on, although I'm usually not fond of the cliché that two opponents are isolated and are forced to talk out their differences. While the idea that they have to take care of an alien baby is too cutesy for my taste, I like how it is visualized and how the plot twist is incorporated that the hatchling needs exactly the vapor to survive that is harmful to Tom and Neelix.

Overall, this is an episode with an extremely poor start that still leaves me half-way satisfied in the end, also because Tom and Neelix' truce will persist.

Annotations

Rating: 2

 

Persistence of Vision

Synopsis

Stardate not given: As Voyager is about to enter Bothan space, where starships are rumored to have disappeared, Janeway takes a break and runs her holonovel. Back on duty, she suddenly encounters objects and characters from the novel on the ship. Kes seems to share her hallucinations. While the Doctor runs further examinations on Janeway, Chakotay negotiates a possible right of passage with a Bothan official. But the Bothans appear with more ships and surround Voyager. In the following, more and more crew members are incapacitated by hallucinations induced by a psionic field created by the Bothans, leaving only the Doctor and Kes. In engineering, Kes works on completing the generation of a warp pulse that B'Elanna initiated to disrupt the psionic field. But "Neelix" appears and tries to stop her. Kes manages to reflect the psionic energy and thereby disables the Bothan posing as Neelix. Janeway threatens to lock up the Bothan, but he disappears without trace.

Commentary

Rather than the idea of a crew that is subjected to mind control or hallucinations, as it happens just too frequently in Star Trek, it is interesting to witness what everyone's fears and desires are like.

Janeway is chased by the characters from her Victorian holonovel and then meets her fiancé Mark who tells her to relax, which ultimately incapacitates her. Paris encounters his father, who says that his son messes up everything, which is the trigger for Tom to lose control over his mind. Tuvok sees his wife on the viewscreen, which confounds him. Kim beholds his fiancée Libby (as he says, she is not actually shown). B'Elanna has a quite special hallucination, in which Chakotay confesses that he loves her and they have sex. We don't learn what kind of vision the true Chakotay has in this story, though. Finally, Kes imagines to see Tom as well as Neelix, and while the illusory Tom is injured and needs her help, the false Neelix wants to protect and patronize her.

What I really like is that it is up to Kes to save the ship, with a little help from the Doctor. She has the potential to evolve from the little girl to a valuable crew member, and for once her superior mental abilities are to Voyager's advantage.

Although it is obvious they wanted to take the ship, the Bothans remain mysterious. Maybe not a bad idea, since I'm tired of the type of villains whose motivation is either obvious or needs to be exhaustively explained by themselves until it makes sense. Also, without the need to care much about the Bothans, the episode turns out thrilling. 

Annotations

Rating: 5

 

Tattoo

Synopsis

Stardate not given: On an uninhabited moon with polyferranide deposits Chakotay finds a symbol of the Rubber Tree People, the ancestors of his tribe. When he was 15 years old, Chakotay met the Rubber Tree People on an expedition with his father Kolopak in the Central American rainforest. At that time, Chakotay wasn't fond of his father's ways. Only after Kolopak had died, Chakotay embraced his father's ideas and got his tattoo that mimicks the facial features of the Rubber Tree People. Voyager follows a warp trail that leads away from the moon to a planet. Suddenly forming turbulences do not allow to use the transporter, so Chakotay, Tuvok, Neelix and B'Elanna take shuttle to the surface. Neelix is injured by a bird similar to a hawk and is beamed up to sickbay. When the other three crew members find traces of a civilization, a storm forms and separates Chakotay from the rest. Janeway orders to land Voyager in order to find Chakotay, but the ship gets caught in a huge cyclone. Chakotay finally meets the inhabitants of the planet, the "Sky Spirits". The Sky Spirits visited Earth 45,000 years ago and gave the Rubber Tree People an "inheritance" in the form of a genetic code. When they returned to Earth twelve generations ago, they found no trace of the Rubber Tree People and believed they had been extinguished. Chakotay tells the Sky Spirits that Voyager means no harm to his culture, and the aliens release the ship.

Commentary

I like Indian culture in general and I am also glad about every human crew member who is not of British or Irish origin. The idea to explore Chakotay's cultural background is laudable, also considering that so far we learned about him that he is a composed and tolerant person but rather little about his personal life except that he practices Native Indian rituals. I like the flashbacks of Chakotay's expedition with his father, and I can understand how young Chakotay, who is a rather rational person, defies Kolopak's attempts to make him embrace the culture of his forefathers. Unfortunately I have many issues with the story that was built around Chakotay's history.

It is a recurring problem of Voyager and will become one of the most prominent clichés of the series that every few weeks the ship runs into people and artifacts from the Alpha Quadrant, on the other side of the galaxy. Such a plot device may be justified to tell an exciting story like in "The 37's" earlier in this season or in "Dreadnought", a few episodes later. In the case of "Tattoo" there is no such excitement. At least, I don't mind the mumbo-jumbo of storms or animals that suddenly attack the crew and that were meant to beef up the story (well, and to demonstrate that nature, or the mastery of nature, may be stronger than technology). The revelation that the Sky Spirits came to Earth long ago and guided the Rubber Tree People is predictable and just too reminiscent of TOS: "The Paradise Syndrome". As much as I cherish how strongly Chakotay is involved, it is lame and anticlimactic how it boils down to "aliens influence the development of Earth" and "Earth artifacts in the Delta Quadrant".

The thing that bothers me most about the episode is the racist attitude of the Sky Spirits. When they first visited Earth some 45,000 years ago, they ruled that the Rubber Tree People (or those who should become the Rubber Tree People) "did have a respect for the land and for other living creatures that impressed us deeply", whereas they condemned the rest of humanity. They do have a point in hindsight, considering that "those with no respect for life or land" eventually destroyed the ancient culture they created. It is a recurring theme in the media that non-European cultures are romanticized as unequivocally peaceful and eco-friendly, and that this is contrasted with all the bad things that allegedly only the white man brings forth. It is particularly insidious that in this Voyager story "wise" aliens maintain the same racial prejudices, although they don't explicitly mention the European conquest of America. And it is even worse that these aliens tamper with the genes of human beings in order to let them appear and act more like themselves. Agreed, there may be different opinions on if and how an endangered culture or genetic traits of a people should be protected or fostered. The Prime Directive of the Federation may not be the best solution in every case. Still, what the Sky Spirits are doing ("We help only those who comply with our ideas and make them become like us.") is determined by a kind of racism that is unbecoming of a highly evolved race, especially since it would be very unlikely if war and violence had never existed in their own history. And while the first humanoids in TNG: "The Chase" interfered with the evolution of life on a much larger scale, at least they didn't have a concept of racism that prefers one human or humanoid civilization over another. On the contrary, the ancient humanoids were naive enough to hope that the discovery of a common ancestry would promote peace among the humanoid races they created. The Sky Sprits, in contrast, adhere to a late 20th century style racism that appears as politically correct in the historical context of the criticism of colonialism but is wrong nonetheless. We also shouldn't forget that they were ready to kill members of the Voyager crew and even to destroy the ship because of those perpetuated prejudices, although they could have known better and although for someone with superior weapons talking should always be the first option. So although the Sky Spirits were meant as a charming race that cares for peace above all, this is not the impression they make on me.

It is also clear that the Sky Spirits have much the same role in the history and religion of the Rubber Tree People as the Judeo-Christian God in the Bible. There are several clear cues in the episode such as the creation of people "in their own image" and the existence of a "chosen people" and a "sacred land". It is intersting, however, that the religion of the Rubber Tree People is not criticized in the episode, although it bears many traits of a "false god" syndrome. Well, and if we decide to take the Old Testament literally, God would be just as racist as the Sky Spirits.

On another note about the Rubber Tree People, they are not a real tribe but made up for this episode. It is obvious that they must have been insignificant among America's native population even before the European conquerors arrived. So if the intention of the Sky Spirits (or of the writers) was to stigmatiize white people in this particular case as "those with no respect for life or land", it doesn't work in the first place, considering that other Native Americans must have destroyed or absorbed the culture of the Rubber Tree People and all records of their existence.

Notwithstanding the above remarks "Tattoo" is a fine Chakotay episode. It is revealing that he was not that fond of his culture at first, but tried to catch up with it as late as after his father's death and, as he says, rather to honor his father than out of a spritual motivation. In some way, the alien influence on the Rubber Tree People and the overall indefinite cultural background (his own tribe is never named) make Chakotay an alien too. I only wish it had been possible to tell this story without Voyager accidentally encountering the aliens in the Delta Quadrant and without the racism and hypocrisy of the Sky Spirits.

In the B-plot the Doctor is criticized by Kes for not having enough compassion with his patients. He then infects himself with a simulated 29-hour Levodian flu, expecting that it would last exactly 29 hours. Kes, however, prolongs his suffering, thereby giving him the same uncertainty that patients normally feel about their illness. I find this sub-plot quite amusing, although the Doctor's sudden unkindness toward the pregnant Ensign Wildman is not plausible and feels like a setback in his development that would better fit into season 1. Anyway, the experience of an illness ultimately causes his character to progress.

Annotations

Rating: 3

 

Cold Fire

Synopsis

Stardate not given: When the remains of the Caretaker in a closet in sickbay suddenly resonate, the crew begins to search for what is apparently the other sporocystian lifeform that guarded the Ocampa homeworld, in the hope to acquire the technology that can take the ship home. They find a smaller version of the Caretaker Array, populated by over 2000 Ocampa, but no trace of the sporocystian lifeform. A man named Tanis beams over to Voyager. After talking with Kes, he agrees to assist in the search for the other member of the Nacene species named Suspiria. He also helps Kes develop the psychokinetic powers that apparently all Ocampa possess but that were largely unexplored on the Ocampa homeworld. When she demonstrates to Tuvok how to heat up a cup of water, she doesn't manage to stop the fire and injures Tuvok. Suspiria finally appears on the ship in the form of a little girl and all she wants is to take revenge for the alleged killing of her companion. Tanis tries to talk Kes into joining Suspiria and him, but when he hurts Neelix she turns her psychokinetic forces against Tanis, thereby distracting Suspiria. Janeway disables Suspiria with a weapon that Tuvok recommended to build for a possible confrontation with a sporocystian lifeform. In order to convince Suspiria of their good intentions, Janeway releases her. Suspiria vanishes into subspace, taking Tanis with her.

Commentary

"Cold Fire" begins with a recap of the events of "Caretaker". This is unusual for an episode that isn't the second part of a two-part feature and not really necessary because all the essential information about the Caretaker is provided later in the episode. Actually, some of the Seska/Kazon episodes would have rather required a special intro for less frequent viewers.

I'm undecided whether or not Kes is a strong character in this story. On one hand, it is about time that Kes is given an important role, one that consists of more than saying something like "I sense fear/anger" like Deanna in the first seasons of TNG and the involvement in humorous B-plots. "Elogium" was merely an interlude without real consequences for herself and the rest of the crew, so "Cold Fire" is the first real chance to further develop her character. And it is quite a leap in this story, considering how impressive her newly discovered psychokinetic abilities are.

On the other hand, Kes is faced with a stereotypically female problem to make a decision between Tanis and Neelix and therefore between career and love. Unfortunately, the decision is made for her when Tanis' and Suspiria's real intentions are revealed and she recognizes that she has been a pawn in their game all along. At least she pays back Tanis in his own coin when she uses the powers that he taught her against him.

This episode is a further step in Kes' development. It is only a pity that her supernatural abilities come into play only on a few selected other occasions, in the past as well as in future episodes. It is like the writers still don't really know how to write for Kes, and how to involve her more than only in cutesy sub-plots. Kes' intention not to use her powers again is not a sufficient explanation for her abstinence. As Tuvok says, it is an important part of her that she should not deny. And the writers shouldn't do it either.

Overall, this is a better Kes-centered episode than "Elogium" but otherwise it could have been more exciting and more revealing. In particular, it is anticlimactic that the story first makes a big deal of Suspiria, but then Suspiria appears only briefly in the end, in a scene in engineering that is almost a carbon copy of the confrontation with the Bothan in "Persistence of Vision".

Annotations

Rating: 4

 

Maneuvers 

Stardate: 49208.5: Voyager follows the transmission of a Federation signal, only to run into a trap set up by the Kazon-Nistrim. They break through Voyager's hull with an armored shuttle and steal a transporter module. It turns out that Maje Culluh of the Kazon-Nistrim received support from Seska. After Culluh's negotiations with the Kazon-Relora end with him beaming their representatives into space, Seska convinces him to forge an alliance with other Kazon sects. Chakotay, who feels guilty for Seska's treason, takes a shuttle and attempts to retrieve the technology on his own, but he is captured upon destroying the transporter module. Janeway sets a course to save Chakotay. When it is not possible to beam out Chakotay, Janeway has the Kazon leaders beamed aboard and Chakotay and his shuttle are returned in exchange for their freedom. Seska leaves another message for Chakotay, telling him that she secretly impregnated herself with his DNA.

Commentary

This episode lives up to its title. It features various unusual maneuvers indeed: the Kazon attack with the armored shuttle, Chakotay's stealth approach of the Kazon ship, Janeway's idea to beam over the Kazon majes instead of Chakotay. I like the story of deception, betrayal and cunning very much. And although the directing is rather routine and doesn't create a real climax, it is never boring for a minute.

I see a few issues with the relationship between Culluh and Seska and with her motivation. In the first-season episode "State of Flux" I already didn't understand Seska's reasons to defect to the Kazon. She accused Janeway of getting the crew stranded in the Delta Quadrant, but she herself did everything to ensure she'd have to stay there for the rest of her life. She suggested that Janeway should have built a "base of power", but she allies herself with a rather unremarkable people, and even with one of the weakest of their factions as it seems. All this continues to make little sense in "Maneuvers". It is also very clear that she is not in love with Culluh either but that the two have just a limited purpose alliance. Seska has the knowledge of technology and strategic planning that Culluh obviously lacks, while Culluh throws in his determination and his standing in the Kazon society. At one point, Chakotay tells Culluh that she's using him, speaking of his own experience. Culluh replies that he is convinced that he is using her. I tend to agree with Culluh on long term because realistically Seska has no future in the Kazon society that is dominated by men, and no future at the side of a man who simply kills everyone who doesn't agree with him.

So Seska may have overestimated her ability to create a "base of power" with the Kazon. Still, her maneuvers in this episode work out well for the most part. This is also the fault of the Starfleet crew that appears rather naive and incompetent especially in the beginning. Why does no one suspect the defector Seska of sending the Federation signal? Why does no one anticipate that it icould be a trap? Why does Janeway order to return fire so late after Culluh's sneak attack? Why is security ordered to the hull breach as late as the Kazon have already boarded the ship?

And speaking of the incompetent Starfleet crew, Chakotay clearly takes the cake. While his plan to use a shuttle to take back the transporter module is intelligent, it is incredibly stupid and irresponsible of him to try it on his own. Also, he should have known that with his message that no attempt should be made to rescue him he would only achieve the opposite. Overall, Tuvok seems to be the only one who remains reasonable in this episode: "If a rescue attempt forces us to engage the Kazon, there is always a possibility that more of our technology will fall into their hands."

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Resistance

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Janeway, Tuvok, Torres and Neelix are on the Alsaurian homeworld to purchase tellerium, a substance urgently needed for the ship's warp drive. Soldiers of the Mokra Order appear and arrest Tuvok and Torres. Neelix escapes with the tellerium, whereas Janeway gets shot but is saved by the local resistance movement. She wakes up in the home of an old man named Caylem. Caylem insists on Janeway being his daughter Ralkana. He also believes that his wife is still imprisoned by the Mokra Order and dreams of freeing her. In reality, his wife has been dead for twelve years, and Ralkana was killed in an attempt to break into the prison. Caylem and Janeway deicde to try it once again, albeit for different reasons. In the meantime, Chakotay and Harry, whose negotiations with the Mokra Order were unsuccessful, have forged a plan to beam out the missing crew members. Inside the prison, Caylem and Janeway run into Augris, Caylem's old enemy. Caylem stabs Augris, but he himself is killed when he protects his "daughter". Janeway, Tuvok and Torres are beamed back to the ship.

Commentary

"Resistance is futile". Sorry for this awkward pun, but it summarizes what I think about this uninspiring and predictable episode.

One thing I like about "Resistance" is that it jumps straight into action, and spares us of a long exposition or of a trivial B-plot as it can be found in too many episodes. I also appreciate the efforts to create a credible alien world, with very diverse and detailed sets, and with the inclusion of some off-world aliens besides the dominant Alsaurians. The Mokra Order too comes across as unusually realistic, not overly cruel but determined to exert violence whenever someone is considered dangerous. The satellite grid and the planet-based defense (that more planets in Star Trek should have, not to mention Earth) are symptomatic of their wish to defend themselves against anyone they see as a threat.

However, after Janeway has been separated from the rest of the crew, it all boils down to her hanging around with Caylem as some kind of father figure. His character reminds me of Mullibok in the equally boring episode DS9: "Progress". The circumstances are different here and at least there is a reason for Janeway's prolonged stay on the planet, but just like Kira in the DS9 episode she develops an unlikely emotional attachment to the old man (of the kind that would never be written for a male main character). Tuvok and Torres have to suffer in the prison to no end, and Chakotay's and Kim's attempts to get them released are not interesting either.

I have a beef with Caylem's character anyway because he doesn't feel realistic. On one hand, he is a senile old man who lives in the past and who doesn't get the most obvious things right. On the other hand, he is energetic and even efficient in what he is doing here and now, always a bit like in the scene when he plays a lunatic to distract the Mokra Order to allow his fellow resistance member to escape. I really wonder whether Caylem may be aware that Janeway isn't his daughter all the time and is pulling her leg just like he fools the Mokra Order. The way he smiles sometimes looks like that. Joel Grey performs Caylem's part very well in the sense of acting, but Caylem was written in a way that doesn't feel right.

The story gains pace as late as in the final minutes but remains utterly predictable. Caylem gets the chance to exert revenge and finds deliverance in his own death. My two points are for the quality of the dialogues and for the good interaction of Janeway and Caylem, which can't really compensate for the meager plot though.

Annotations

Rating: 2

 

Prototype

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Voyager picks up a damaged robot from space. After attempting in vain to restore the robot's power system, B'Elanna comes up with the idea to use modified warp plasma as a power source. The android wakes up and identifies himself as Automated Pralor Unit 3947, apparently the survivor of a global crisis in which the humanoid inhabitants of the Pralor homeworld, the "Creators", were all killed. Janeway refuses to develop a power module that would allow to build more Pralor androids. When he is going to be returned to his people, 3947 kidnaps B'Elanna and forces her to construct a prototype with a universal power module. When the Pralor ship is attacked by a similar vessel of the Cravic, 3947 reveals that the Pralor and Cravic civilizations had both built androids to fight each other, but the androids wound up killing their creators and continued the war on their own, whereupon B'Elanna destroys the prototype. Tom takes a shuttle and can use the diversion to rescue B'Elanna. 

Commentary

"Prototype" is the first of two excellent episodes in season 2 that focus on B'Elanna and that, unlike "Faces" in season 1, don't have anything to do with her partly Klingon heritage. It is pleasant that the writers work out her passion of being an engineer and her sense of duty, rather than exploiting all kinds of clichés about Klingons in a society dominated by humans. And although later episodes, beginning with "Extreme Risk", will spotlight B'Elanna's struggle with her Klingon nature again, by that time B'Elanna will have been established as a character with many facets that only happens to be half-Klingon. In a manner of speaking, B'Elanna is less clichéd than the roughly corresponding alien main characters from the previous Trek series, namely Spock, Worf and Odo.

Already the teaser of "Prototype", showing the events from the perspective of 3947, is very promising, and the rest of the episode keeps this promise. Although there is not much progress in B'Elanna's efforts to power up the robot until she has the idea to use modified warp plasma, there is not a single minute of boredom and not a single unnecessary filler scene in the whole episode.

One of the best scenes is B'Elanna's dispute with Janeway whether to provide the robots with new power modules or not. It is remarkable that it's not just the usual arguing about the Prime Directive, but touches very basic ethic problems. Are the robots actually lifeforms? If yes, do they have to be preserved from extinction, or is it right to deny them the requested reproduction? Would it be the same as helping a biological species that has become sterile, or is it that the robots are just not designed to reproduce?

B'Elanna's dedication and excitement to get the apparently friendly robot running again is very personal, as is her disappointment about being deceived by Automated Unit 3947 more than once. As the plot unfolds, the suspense rises gradually up to the culmination when it is revealed that the Pralor and Cravic robots actually killed their creators.

At first, I didn't like the idea of having incompatible power modules, which seems to be a recurring problem in Star Trek. Is there no equivalent of a simple transformer for generating a suited type of power? Anyway, this time the power modules are a kind of copyright protection, which makes sense with regard to the dedicated warlike nature of the robots.

Annotations

Rating: 8

 

Alliances

Synopsis

Stardate 49337.4: The death of former Maquis Kurt Bendera, the third fatality in a Kazon attack in two weeks, causes unrest especially among Chakotay's people. On Tuvok's suggestion Janeway decides to form an alliance with some of the Kazon factions. However, her negotiation with First Maje Culluh of the Kazon-Nistrim and former Voyager crew member Seska fails when Janerway refuses to exchange crew members. Neelix contacts a member of the Kazon-Pommar on the planet Sobras but is arrested in a camp where also a number of Trabe are prisoners of the Pommar, including a high-ranking official named Mabus. The Trabe once ruled over the Kazon until the Kazon rebelled and expelled the Trabe from their homeworld. After he has been freed by his people, Mabus assures Janeway that all he wants is to find a new planet for his people to settle down, without being attacked by the Kazon. Janeway decides to ally herself with the Trabe. She arranges a peace conference on Sobras and invites all the first majes of the Kazon. But Mabus has set up a trap, and a Trabe ship attacks the conference room. Disgusted by this attempt to assassinate his enemies, Janeway ends the alliance with Mabus.

Commentary

The morale on the ship hits a low point when Kurt Bendera is killed. It is a clear mistake that Bendera never appeared in the series before, although he seems to have been a friend of B'Elanna and Chakotay. At least, the emotional impact could have been much greater in case a recurring character had died. Anyway, seeing that the laws of the Federation and most of all the Prime Directive get people killed for very little or no benefit as it seems, it is quite understandable that the former Maquis would question Janeway's policy. Chakotay tries to speak for his people but Janeway has to remind him that her ship isn't a democracy. It is quite obvious that Janeway, at this point of the series, is tired about Chakotay always trying to find a middle way and not unequivocally accepting rules and orders.

It is Tuvok who strikes a chord with Janeway. He shows her the hybrid plant that he says is stronger than any of the two different species it is composed of. And more to the point, he cites Spock's mission to seek peace with the Klingons in "Star Trek VI" as an example where an initially unpleasant alliance brought both sides peace and stability. I like Janeway's consultation with Tuvok very much, although his advice turns out to be a big mistake and, quite frankly, is doomed to fail from the outset.

I also think that Janeway is too much set on forming an alliance with a Kazon faction - she makes it sound like she would accept any faction that agreed not to attack Voyager any longer. Seeing that Janeway is quite impartial and probably too impartial about her choice of an ally, it seems to make sense what Harry and B'Elanna propose, and which is supported by Tom and Chakotay (didn't Janeway mention that her ship isn't a democracy?): Why not seek an alliance with Seska? But would Janeway have any reason to trust Seska and Culluh of all possible allies? Seska, who betrayed the crew in "State of Flux" and was apparently the mastermind behind the attack in "Maneuvers"? Culluh, who executed one of his men in "State of Flux" and the two representatives of another sect in "Maneuvers"? We may call it open-minded, but Janeway is too much smitten with Tuvok's idea that peace between former enemies is always possible and also with Chakotay's idea of democracy (or favoritism, regarding Seska?): She should rather trust her own instincts at this point of the episode.

And so when she invites Culluh and Seska with a serious proposal for an alliance, the inevitable happens. Culluh seems to agree on all points of the deal (including the non-proliferation of weapons and other technology), but the two disagree about the exchange of crew members. A point that, as Seska suggests, could well be postponed. But Culluh says: "I won't have a woman dictate terms to me." He particularly refers to Seska contradicting him but he certainly implies that he wouldn't feel bound to a deal with Janeway either. And so the deal fails because Culluh is such a macho and because Janeway hates nothing more than machos, rather than because of a legal, ethical or any other factual issue.

After this setback it is almost like a dream coming true when Janeway meets Mabus of the Trabe. In a manner of speaking, the Trabe are in a similar situation. They are also more civilized than the Kazon. They even wear Bajoran-style earrings. And above all Mabus seems to be a decent man who has learned his lesson from the Trabe's mistakes in history. We can notice that somehow an even greater picture forms in Janeway's mind. It is not only about safe passage for Voyager any longer, not only about some truce between single factions. Now Janeway wants the Kazon to make peace among each other and with their enemies. "Stability in this quadrant", as it is mentioned two or three times in the episode. This is too big a goal. And forging an alliance with the Trabe prior to talking with the Kazon about peace is an inexcusable mistake.

The conference with the majes never had any chance of success. Culluh and Seska only joined to obtain strategical information. Mabus, who set up the trap, only beat them to it. It is clear that Janeway would never want to deal with Mabus again. She has any right to be infuriated about how he misused her trust. On the other hand, this should be no reason not to deal with the Trabe again. And speaking of Janeway refusing to make "deals with executioners", she previously invited Culluh who, as already mentioned, is known to have executed people on two occasions.

Overall, everyone loses in this story, as the conflicts between the Kazon and the Trabe as well as between the Kazon and Voyager will likely intensify after the unprovoked attack on the majes. While it is not the best episode in the Kazon arc, I like the disillusionment and I only wish Janeway's solemn speech in the end to build up the morale on the ship again had been omitted. I don't think that her idea that the ideals of the Federation are "the best allies" would appease the Maquis. At least we know it has no effect on Michael Jonas who will keep transmitting information to Seska and whose motivation receives a boost from the total failure of the senior staff to achieve something for their ship.

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Threshold

Synopsis

Stardate 49373.4: Tom, Paris B'Elanna Torres and Harry Kim are working on equipping a shuttle to reach Warp 10 - infinite speed! Although there is a slight chance that Tom could suffer brain damage, he pilots the shuttle. The experiment succeeds. Tom achieves Warp 10 and crosses the whole universe back and forth in just an instant. Some time after his safe return he doesn't feel well. He is taken to sickbay where the Doctor diagnoses a strange metamorphosis of his body. It appears that the Warp 10 flight accelerated Tom's natural evolution to a new, "more evolved" lifeform. During an unsuccessful attempt to restore Tom's original body using antiprotons, Tom breaks free. He kidnaps Janeway, takes the shuttle and goes to Warp 10 again. Voyager finds the two in a jungle on a nearby planet. They have "evolved" to amphibious creatures resembling newts and have children! The Doctor manages to restore their human nature, while their kids are left behind.

Commentary

There is no other Star Trek Voyager episode that ever got such a bad rap as "Threshold". Many fans even consider this to be the worst episode of all Star Trek. I must admit that when I watched the first run (on VHS) some time in 1997, I didn't find it all that horrible. But I have to add it was on a video night with friends, and most likely the good mood, pizza and beer contributed to my comparably positive experience of "Threshold".

We don't have to dig deep to find the reasons why everyone, including myself by now, finds "Threshold" cringeworthy. It is quite obvious that a story in which Tom achieves an impossible speed, loses his tongue, evolves to some newt, kidnaps Janeway, has children with her and is completely restored in the end can hardly have any redeeming qualities that could save the episode. The countless violations of fundamental laws of logic, mathematics, physics, biology and engineering add insult to injury. Regular viewers of science fiction are ready to accept concepts such as warp drive, not only because they are well established but also because there are reasonable limitations to it. It seems that all the limitations and especially the rule "Warp 10 equals infinite speed and hence is impossible" were dropped for no good reason, essentially just for the curious note that during his Warp 10 flight Tom was everywhere at once (or rather nowhere at all?).

Ironically, the Kazon who is contacted by traitor Jonas is the most intelligent character in the whole episode: "Warp 10, that's impossible." Absolutely correct. So why didn't Braga simply stick to this fundamental law of Star Trek and of real science?

Even as we look past the blatant scientific failings of the story, there are massive plot holes, and hardly anything the characters say or do makes sense. It is symptomatic of the lazy writing how Tom, B'Elanna and Harry first explain a hypothetical and explicitly "impossible" scenario of a flight with infinite speed to Neelix (actually, to the viewer) - only to say in the very next sentence that they are working on it nonetheless! The same happens again when Tom states that he has crossed the Warp 10 "barrier", and then Harry is puzzled why the shuttle disappears from the sensors. Wasn't exactly that the very purpose or at least the expected result of the Warp 10 flight? And it happens yet again when B'Elanna muses about finding a way to "come out of transwarp at a specific point". She seems to have forgotten that Tom did come out at a specific point very close to Voyager, and he will repeat that feat when he kidnaps Janeway to a nearby planet.

"Threshold" also fails in terms of character relationships. The scene in which Janeway comes to Tom's quarters to tell him there's a risk of brain damage if he should make that flight was obviously supposed to get a bit of character development for Tom into this tech-heavy story. But in his reaction Tom is so obsessed that it's almost out of character, and a bit like it foreshadows his pretentiousness after the warp flight for no good reason. Furthermore it is a clear omission that we never learn how everyone besides Kes reacts to Tom's apparent death, because the next scene already shows his resurrection. This raises the question why Tom had to die at all, considering that the scene in which he loses his tongue is shown as more dramatic (but also comes across as more ridiculous). It is like quite a couple of important scenes were cut from episode. Something similar happens once again when the Doctor miraculously brings back Tom and Janeway, although he previously failed at a time when much more of the original Tom was left. Like already in "Cathexis" the reset button restores characters not only against all odds but also with absolutely no visible effort.

The only point is for the unintentional entertaining potential of the episode, of the kind that already "Spock's Brain" had.

Annotations

Rating: 1

 

Meld

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Crewman Darwin is found dead in an EPS conduit in engineering. The Doctor finds out that the contusion on Darwin's head was caused by a tool hitting his head. The man was murdered. The only other crew member working in engineering at that time was Ensign Suder, a Betazoid and former Maquis member. When the Doctor finds Suder's DNA on Darwin's head it is clear that Suder killed him. Tuvok seeks in vain for a motive or for any logical explanation of the crime. He mind-melds with Suder to understand why he killed the crewmate for no obvious reason. But after the procedure Tuvok develops violent tendencies himself. He demolishes his quarters and is taken to sickbay for a treatment that involves taking away Tuvok's control of his emotions. Tuvok breaks free and threatens to execute Suder. He attempts another mind meld and breaks down. Suder is locked up in secure quarters, where he will spend the rest of the journey.

Commentary

It is one of the oldest controversies in psychology and in criminology whether criminal behavior (of a single offender or in general) is rather attributed to the milieu or rather inherited. The answer to this question has an impact on the penalty and on the possible rehabilitation of an offender. In the world of Star Trek the issue has a special significance because the absence of war and poverty in the Federation goes along with practically non-existent crime. Picard says: "The acquisition of wealth is no longer the driving force of our lives. We work to better ourselves and the rest of humanity." Are the humans of the future so much better than we are today, or are just the circumstances of their lives so much better? And is it really true that there is almost no crime in the Federation, or is it only a convenient paraphrase for "almost no property crime rooted in poverty"?

"Meld" is extraordinary for two reasons. First of all, it demonstrates that neither the world of the Federation nor the people living in it are perfect, and that the origin of violence may lie within the Federation itself, and not always in an aggressive alien species. While I think it becomes clear that Suder is more or less violent by nature, it is slightly detrimental to his character that he used to be a Maquis and that he never had much sympathy with the Federation. I think that if the intention was to show the dark side of the society of the 24th century, the message could have been stronger if Suder had been one of Janeway's original crew.

Speaking of Suder's affiliation, it is disappointing anyway that neither he nor his victim ever previously appeared in the series. I understand the intention to show that anyone (Suder) could murder someone else (Darwin), and that still someone else (Tuvok) could be drawn into that crime to an extent that he gets too deeply involved in it, mentally and emotionally. Still, I think some introduction of Darwin and Suder would have been beneficial for the story.

The second reason why "Meld" stands out is that TV series and movies usually show us either the kind of "ordinary" criminals who kill for power, money or jealousy, or some kind of weird serial killers with a fetish. Suder is nothing like that. He doesn't have a motive, which is what puzzles Tuvok. But he also lacks the abnormal behavior of the stereotypical maniacal movie villain. Agreed, Suder is not a pleasant guy, we all know what Chakotay meant by "there was something in his eyes". But I think Brad Dourif plays Suder with an unexpected deal of decency. And notably without evil grinning, laughing or crying. Suder is not a character we would want to kill for what he has done but we wouldn't exonerate him either (such as with the defense that he had a violent childhood or, in this case, that he witnessed Cardassian atrocities). We don't learn what really drives Suder to kill people. And I think Tuvok doesn't find it out either, even after he experiences the violent tendencies himself. In this regard it may have been a good decision not to reveal more about Suder's background.

One question that bugs me about Tuvok's violent behavior after his mind meld is whether it is in Tuvok's very nature and resurfaces (as Tuvok suggests himself), or whether it rather comes from Suder (after all, the exchange of thoughts and emotions is what mind melds are about). This issue also has a more general significance. The idea that the mind meld only triggers something that already was in Tuvok himself (dormant or suppressed) would support the notion that everyone can become criminal under certain circumstances. This idea may have been included in order to avert the impression that some people (like Suder) are more prone to become criminal than others (Tuvok).

Overall, this is an episode with remarkable performances by Brad Dourif as the "decent maniac" and Tim Russ as the "Vulcan out of his mind". It shows an unusual but perhaps realistic type of a criminal, as well as new facets of the Vulcan way to suppress emotions. It doesn't answer the question whether someone becomes criminal because of his genes or rather because of experiences. 

Annotations

Rating: 5

 

Dreadnought

Synopsis

Stardate 49447.8: Voyager runs into a debris field caused by a weapon of mass destruction of Cardassian origin. B'Elanna admits that back in her Maquis days, she reprogrammed a captured Cardassian weapon nicknamed "Dreadnought" to attack a Cardassian fuel depot on Aschelan V. Having been pulled into the Delta Quadrant by the Caretaker, Dreadnought now believes the navigational data is a deception and heads for the densely populated planet Rakosa V. B'Elanna beams over to disable Dreadnought, and the wepoan deactivates itself. But as she is back on Voyager, Dreadnought resumes its course for Rakosa V, under the opinion that B'Elanna has been coerced to work with the Cardassians. The armed forces of Rakosa V try in vain to stop Dreadnought. B'Elanna manages to beam over again. But after another fruitless attempt to convince Dreadnought not to attack Rakosa V, Dreadnought concludes that  B'Elanna is its enemy and terminates life support. B'Elanna reactivates the original Cardassian programming of the weapon. This creates a distraction that allows her to try to disable Dreadnought's core. Janeway, however, decides she cannot wait any longer. She orders the crew to abandon the ship and activates Voyager's self-destruct. Only Tuvk remains at her side. Barely a minute before the ship explodes, B'Elanna reports that she has destroyed Dreadnought's computer core. She is beamed back just before the weapon detonates.

Commentary

"Dreadnought" is one of the most exciting thrillers in Star Trek's history, comparable in many ways to TOS: "The Doomsday Machine". And just like the awesome TOS episode, it is exciting to watch from the first to the last minute.

It is obvious that the "stubborn computer/bomb" theme is nothing new in science fiction. It previously appeared in "2001: A Space Odyssey", in "Dark Star" and in TOS: "The Ultimate Computer". The behavior of Dreadnought's computer is awfully logical and inflexible. Yet, it sometimes seems that it protects and justifies its mission and ultimately its right to exist much like a human being would do: "The probability of being in the Delta Quadrant, 70,000 light-years from the last confirmed position, is negligible." Dreadnought seems to make up its own interpretation of what is negligible, and this is most unsettling. Moreover, Dreadnought deceives B'Elanna on her first visit and reverts its deactivation. Dreadnought also proposes a deal to B'Elanna when she takes  phaser to break through to its core, in an act of self-preservation or perhaps a last desperate attempt to achieve its goal.

The fact that the computer is speaking with B'Elanna's voice creates an odd situation. In some way she is threatened by herself, and perhaps she really added a bit of her personality to the weapon. The dialogues between Dreadnought and B'Elanna are a clear homage to HAL-9000, most obviously the irrelevant phrases like "Did you sleep well last night." I don't think this is a deficiency, at least I enjoyed it very much. An absolute tidbit is the dispute between the Maquis program and the obsolete Cardassian file that try to eliminate each other. It reminds me a bit of the communication between Windows and a program by a hardware manufacturer, which both simultaneously demand to get their drivers installed, once new hardware is detected.

For B'Elanna this is the third focus episode after "Faces" and "Prototype". The rest of the cast take a backseat. Still, the story successfully integrates bits about the ongoing struggle between Paris and Chakotay, Michael Jonas' contact with the Kazon and Ensign Wildman's pregnancy.

Annotations

Rating: 9

 

Death Wish

Synopsis

Stardate not given: B'Elanna beams aboard a sample from a comet with an anomalous trajectory. To her big surprise a man materializes on the transporter platform who says his name is Q. This Q is a dissenter of the Q Continuum, who was imprisoned on the comet for his desire to be mortal. The familiar Q appears and claims that if a Q were allowed to commit suicide, it would destabilize the Q Contiuum. When the new Q requests asylum on the ship, it is up to Janeway to decide whether the new Q may become mortal or whether he would have to return to the Continuum. The familiar Q presents three witnesses, whose life the new Q has positively influenced: Isaac Newton, who discovered gravity when Q dropped an apple on his head; Maury Ginsberg, who thanks to Q arrived in time to fix a cable that otherwise would have ruined the Woodstock Festival; William Riker, whose ancestor Thaddius "Old Iron Boots" Riker was saved by a soldier who turns out to be Q. The new Q, however, convincingly demonstrates that his life is meaningless, as there is nothing to explore and nothing to talk about. Despite Q's offer to take the ship home if she favors his demand, she lets the new Q, who calls himself Quinn, stay aboard as a human crew member. His death wish, however, is so strong that he commits suicide briefly later, with a poison provided by the familiar Q.

Commentary

It is amazing in hindsight how the writers of TNG managed to integrate the practical jokes of Q into otherwise serious stories, without letting them appear too silly. "Death Wish", Q's first appearance (of three) on Voyager continues this tradition. Well, there are a few things in the story that get really silly, like the hide-and-seek game that includes Voyager as Christmas tree decoration and being attacked by protons, or Q's wish to mate with Janeway. We enjoyed it a lot when we first watched it almost twenty years ago, so I won't complain about it now.

My impression is that the games the Qs like to play spring from their own nature, but are also a means to impress "primitive" humanoids in order to be worshipped or supported by them in some fashion. It is interesting to notice that the two Qs become more sensible once they realize that Janeway and her crew take the matter more seriously than they would like her to do. The Starfleet crew leave a very good impression anyway in how they handle the two eccentric omnipotent beings. And Tuvok hits the nail with his question: "I am curious. Have the Q always had an absence of manners, or is it the result of some natural evolutionary process that comes with omnipotence?" This is priceless.

I also think that the finger snapping of the two Qs is a fitting theme in the context of the hearing about Q's request for asylum. Trials on TV are always playful, and witnesses often appear out of thin air much like Isaac Newton, Maury Ginsberg and William Riker in this episode.

In spite of all the fanciful ideas of the two Qs, the episode successfully gets to the bottom of the question if an individual is allowed to commit suicide, and if a court may explicitly grant that right to anyone. It is obvious that the real-world analogy is assisted suicide, as it has been legalized in many countries to avoid unnecessary suffering of terminally ill patients. Q aka Quinn is not exactly ill, but his suffering is the central point of the hearing. While it may seem that the episode advocates a universal right of suicide, Janeway only rules in favor of Quinn's becoming mortal because she recognizes that his life as a Q has becoming unendurable. And she doesn't actually sanction his suicide but still hopes he would enjoy the limited life as a human being. Her attempt to convince Quinn that human life isn't that bad is very touching. On the other hand, no one can really expect Quinn to go on living as a mortal being, for every aspect of it can be supposed to be entirely included in his virtually eternal life as a Q. The only new experience would be death, and this is what he gets.

So far I can understand Janeway. However, Janeway decides in Quinn's favor despite Q's promise not to lock up Quinn again (a promise that Q would likely keep) and his offer to bring the ship home. She may have a talent to cling to her ethical values preferably when deciding otherwise would open a chance for the ship to return home. And while it may be laudable that Q's offer apparently did not influence Janeway's decision, I have the impression that Q's macho attitude towards her did play a role the process.

What I like about the episode is the many references and allusions that are consistent with previous events in Star Trek. It is stated that without Quinn there would be no Riker and the Federation would have been assimilated by the Borg. Q's punishment by the Continuum, as shown in TNG: "Déjà Q", is referred to. Janeway makes a very good point about executions of Q Continuum members, as mentioned in TNG: "True Q".

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Lifesigns

Synopsis

Stardate not given: The Doctor saves the life of a Vidiian woman, Dr. Danara Pel, by creating a holographic reproduction of her intact body. The Doctor feels attracted to Danara and they spend a lot of time on the holodeck. Danara likes her new appearance and she even tries to kill her deformed real body, but the Doctor succeeds to convince her that it is necessary to resume her old body. Meanwhile on the bridge, the conflict of Chakotay and Paris escalates, and Paris ends up in the brig.

Commentary

It is a very touching episode about Doctor "Shmullus" and his emerging emotions. The episode also manages to show the whole impact of the Vidiian phage by concentrating on the personal tragedy of a single individual. It is explicitly shown what an attractive and charming person Danara would be without the terrible disease - and wants to be when she realizes it. Fortunately there is no simple statement like "real beauty is inside you" or "outer appearance doesn't matter". It does matter. Yet, one can overcome one's fear and doubts. At one point, it seems as if B'Elanna would deny Danara her help in the same way as Worf refused to donate blood for the injured Romulan in TNG: "The Enemy". Fortunately she can overcome her reservations. Tom's increasingly odd behavior is shown as a little sub-plot, however, with respect to the plan to uncover the traitor it is just too blatant. Wouldn't Jonas be rather alarmed than appeased if there is someone even more interested in leaving the ship?

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Investigations

Synopsis

Stardate not given: As a consequence of his recent insubordination, Tom leaves Voyager and joins a Talaxian convoy, but he is abducted by the Kazon. Neelix investigates the case and he thinks that Tom might have had contact to the Kazon before. Janeway and Tuvok, however, tell him that Tom intentionally behaved like that to get the opportunity to unmask the real traitor. On the Kazon vessel, Tom finds out that it's Jonas, and he escapes with a shuttle. Jonas sabotages Voyager, but in a struggle with Neelix he plunges into a plasma stream and is killed.

Commentary

The episode is a spy story above average, but it reminds me a lot of TOS: "The Enterprise Incident" where the plan was equally stupid. Did Tom actually expect to be kidnapped by the Kazon? How could he be sure he would get an opportunity to find evidence about the traitor? If so, how could he hope he could ever escape? Nevertheless this wasn't Tom's episode, but Neelix's, and focusing on him would have been a good idea under different circumstances if the story had taken place completely on Voyager. We already knew it was Jonas, and it would have served the episode better if it had been a silent duel between him and Neelix, but the minor character obviously wasn't supposed to get more screen time. 

Annotations

Rating: 6

 

Deadlock

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Subspace anomalies inside a nebula cause a quantum duplication of Voyager and crew. One version is heavily damaged, first by proton bursts and later by the Vidiians. Ensign Wildman loses her baby and Harry is blown off the ship through a hull breach. Yet, an undamaged version of Voyager occupies the same space at the same time. In order to save the intact ship, Capt. Janeway of the damaged ship decides to activate the self-destruct. However, as the Vidiians enter the undamaged Voyager, this ship has to be destroyed, after Kim and Naomi Wildman have been transferred to the other ship.

Commentary

Damage to the ship and losses of life have been the weekly business of Voyager, but it has never been that grave so far. It is obvious that the crew and the ship can't go through such a hard time and face such hard decisions every few episodes, because then the subject would be quickly exhausted, not to mention the trouble to explain how the crew recovers and how the ship can be repaired each time. Anyway, it was worth the trouble this time. The chance to bring Janeway and her crew into a truly desperate situation was not wasted, and their distress was even emphasized by showing a second, completely intact ship at the same time. Ironically, the proton bursts from one Voyager are actually the cause of the damages and of Harry's and Naomi's death on the other ship. It is equally ironic that it is eventually the previously undamaged ship that has to be sacrificed.

Annotations

Rating: 7

 

Innocence

Synopsis

Stardate not given: After a shuttle crash that kills the ensign who accompanies him, Tuvok encounters a group of three children. In the meantime, Voyager gets in touch with the purportedly xenophobic Drayans. On the planet, Tuvok tries to comfort the children, who fear a creature, Morrok, that is supposed to kill them. The children are actually members of the Drayan race and were transferred there to die. Drayans are subjected to a reversed aging process, being born as apparently old and wise people and dying as innocent children.

Commentary

The episode begins with a shuttle crash. There haven't been too many so far in the series. But I dislike it as an uninteresting standard procedure to get characters isolated. Moreover, another "unnecessary" ensign has to die. This one gets at least a touching death scene. Nevertheless, it is irresponsible to leave poor Tuvok alone with the three children. Fortunately, just when I was about to dub the episode "Tuvok's Kindergarten", the plot gained some profoundness. Tuvok, the most emotionally challenged of all Vulcans, gets a couple of very nice scenes. He shows a strong fondness for his little friends without losing his impeccable logic. Two points for him, one for the fact that these children are not as annoying as kids have been elsewhere in Star Trek. The rest of the episode is crap. As a matter of fact, the children are old people, while they behave much like real children. There is no way to explain this biological nonsense. All lifeforms on all other planets and even inanimate objects are looking old because they are old. There is no such thing as "reversed aging".

Annotations

Rating: 3

 

The Thaw

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Three individuals have survived a global disaster in cryogenic chambers, but they are firmly linked to a computer system. When Harry and B'Elanna enter the chambers to recover them, they find themselves trapped in a bizarre virtual reality ruled by a clown called "Fear". Fear holds all the five persons hostages, and he may kill anyone by disabling their body functions. Janeway sends the Doctor as a negotiator, and he can persuade Fear to take her instead of the other hostages, but it is a trick, since she is not really hooked up to the system.

Commentary

Why does Janeway beam up the chambers in the first place instead of letting them rest in peace, as it would certainly comply with the Prime Directive? Why does she put two of her officers into the chambers, not taking the risks into account? Only if we forgive her these mistakes we can enjoy the rest of the episode. It's no surprise that it's again the Doctor who saves the day. Immune to Fear's threats and not connected to his mind, the Doctor gives a superior performance. Janeway excels likewise, when she explains that fear/Fear will eventually vanish. Harry is the poor victim again, at least temporarily. It is important to notice that it's because of his thoughts that Fear gets the idea of taking only Janeway hostage instead of the four other people - because it would apparently be more attractive. Harry's idea of Janeway must have been very special. I wonder in how far fear is regarded a permanent state-of-mind in this episode and not only a temporary emotion, and in how far Fear is supposed to be a real character and not only a manifestation of people's emotions that would vanish with their fear. Note the difference between "fear" and "Fear".

It is obvious to compare this episode to other occasions where emotions were incarnated. In TOS: "Day of the Dove" there was an entity consuming hatred, but only in its explicitly shown form and not as a latent emotion. TNG: "Skin of Evil" featured a creature that was the incarnation of the bad emotions of a whole civilization and therefore accordingly evil, although not really credible. DS9: "The Storyteller" shows the Dal'Rok, which can be appeased if people stick together, very much like in "Day of the Dove". Generally speaking, the manifestation named Fear is more believable than the above entities, since emotions are always inherent to a specific being, and are not likely to have a separate, let alone corporeal existence. On the other hand, in this case Fear would have lost his personality when he agreed to accept Janeway as his only hostage. I would have liked to see Janeway's fears, though. ;-)

Rating: 4

 

Tuvix

Synopsis

Stardate 49655.2: Tuvok and Neelix merge to one person because of a transporter accident. This "Tuvix" is healthy and has the personalities, knowledge and abilities of both Neelix and Tuvok, and he fits perfectly into Voyager's crew. When a procedure is developed to split Tuvix again, he refuses and he claims that he is about to be murdered. Yet, Janeway rules the two former crew members have to be retrieved.

Commentary

Tuvok and Neelix merged to one person. It could have wound up as extremely silly, but it became an episode dealing with a profound ethic dilemma that is credibly presented. There is nothing funny at all, except for the beginning. Interestingly, it is not Tuvix' but mainly Kes' episode. She had many good scenes dealing with her attempts to cope with the situation. Both the embarrassment about the strange new crewmate Tuvix and the appreciation of his many abilities were absolutely convincing, and this can be said about the other crew members likewise.

Yet, there were several logical and biological oddities: The basic plot is a bit like "Faces", only with the reverse effect. I wonder why there was no reference to the events in the latter episode, and why it was not considered to apply Vidiian medical techniques to separate Tuvok and Neelix. The combination of the two individuals of different species is described as a Vulcan-Talaxian hybrid, yet, the transporter just assembles and disassembles physically and would not be capable of biological breeding, even with the help of a strange alien plant. It is interesting that even the clothes were merged, maybe the transporter actually entirely superimposed or mixed the two patterns in a creative fashion, but it is virtually impossible to create a viable lifeform this way. The thing that bothered me most is how Tuvok's and Neelix's consciousnesses could survive besides the new merged version in Tuvix' body. Even if this was possible, how could the Doctor and Janeway be sure that it was actually the case? There could have been two mindless persons after the separation. One way to investigate this possibility would have been using Tuvok' or Tuvix' or Kes' telepathic abilities, but this was not even considered an option. It should have revealed if there was something left of Tuvok and Neelix. The only scene I really disliked was Tuvix' shouting all over the bridge, when the decision was made to restore Tuvok and Neelix. Not that I would deny him to fight for what he thinks is his life, but he did it in a blatantly cowardly way so as to let Tuvok and Neelix appear as the better persons who would not have behaved this way. I would have preferred to see Tuvix reluctantly but silently face his death, this would have been much more touching.

Annotations

Rating: 8

 

Resolutions

Synopsis

Stardate not given: Janeway and Chakotay suffer from an incurable virus disease, and only the atmosphere of the home planet of the virus can keep them alive. In the meantime Voyager, now under the command of Tuvok, has left the planet. Despite Janeway's order not to contact the Vidiians they take the risk and eventually obtain a cure from Danara Pel.

Commentary

The plot lives from opposite characters facing one another rather than the confrontation with viruses and Vidiians. There is Tuvok's sense of duty vs. Harry's enthusiasm. Why do I have the impression that Tuvok was waiting for such a clear sign of support all the time after the Vidiian convoy had been detected? Janeway's determination vs. Chakotay's fatalism. I wonder in how far Chakotay's letting go was influenced by his desire to stay with Janeway, he yielded so easily. He was the one who was rather pleased when he caressed Janeway, and her statement "We have to define parameters." should have been a clear sign she didn't want the same thing. Really? Only a few moments later they seemed to settle on an agreement, and this was apparently not about staying away from each other. I was a bit disappointed when the communicators beeped in virtually the next instant. Janeway and Chakotay, it remains an impossible combination because neither of them is giving up their position. Just see the end of the episode, it's business as usual ("Yes, Ma'am.") and not much is wrapped up.

Annotations

Rating: 4

 

Basics I/II

Synopsis

Stardate not given/50032.7: Seska transmits a message, begging Chakotay to rescue her and her child, his alleged son, from the Kazon. Janeway decides to assume that Seska and the child are in actual danger. Tierna, who has apparently fallen out of favor with Culluh, shows them a passage through Kazon territory, and the ship endures only half-hearted attacks. However, when Tierna disrupts the ship's power grid with a suicide bomb, even the self-destruct is disabled after the Kazon ships have permanently attacked the secondary command processor. Seska and Culluh take over the ship and drop the Starfleet crew on a savage planet. Only the Doctor and Ensign Suder stay on board. Paris escapes in a shuttle, while the rest of the crew strives to stay alive on the hostile planet without any technology. Paris acquires help from the Talaxians, while the Doctor and Suder sabotage the ship, so that it is disabled when attacked by Paris, and can be freed from the Kazon. Seska dies and Culluh, the actual father, takes her new-born child.

Commentary

A double feature of big changes and big emotions. Interestingly, to me "Basics" had less coherence than other two-parters. Many questions were already answered at the end of part I, and it was no doubt that the crew would somehow manage to survive on the savage planet and eventually retake the ship. Not that the second part would have been boring, it just told a different story. The perhaps most interesting observation in part I is that Janeway and Chakotay seem to have taken each other's roles. Janeway, the always skeptical leader, trusts Seska too much and makes the irrational decision to help her at all cost. Chakotay, on the other hand, is suspicious like never before. But he may simply put the welfare of the ship above his personal interests. 

Frankly, despite the many precautions, there isn't really a plan to free Seska. Why is Janeway so confident they can take on eight massive Kazon ships, each of them a hundred times as large as Voyager? In "Caretaker" they had lots of trouble with only one of them. Part II necessarily required the fall of the tyrant. It was a bit of a surprise to see that it wasn't Culluh but Seska who eventually died. She would have been more likely to accompany the series as the resident villain than the technologically and tactically challenged Kazon who actually make their last regular appearance in "Basics". It's a pity that the characters of Hogan and Lon Suder were abandoned likewise. Suder's character is fascinating, and it would have been worth at least another episode with a discussion whether he might be rehabilitated.

Annotations

Rating: 8

 


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